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  • Chiles-Whitted UFO encounter




    In the early morning hours of July 24, 1948, Clarence Chiles, chief pilot, and John Whitted, co-pilot, were flying an Eastern Air Lines Douglas DC-3 passenger plane near Montgomery, at about 5,000 feet altitude.[5] The night sky was clear with "the Moon, four days past full, shining through scattered clouds."[1]

    At about 2:45 AM, Chiles "saw a dull red glow above and ahead of the aircraft." He told Whitted "Look, here comes a new Army jet job."[1] The object closed on their DC-3 in a matter of seconds, and both men later said they saw the object fly past the right side of their plane at high speed before it pulled "up with a tremendous burst of flame out of its rear and zoomed up into the clouds." They observed the object for a total of 10 to 15 seconds.[2] Chiles and Whitted stated that the object "looked like a wingless aircraft...it seemed to have two rows of windows through which glowed a very bright light, as brilliant as a magnesium flare."[6] Both pilots claimed the object was 100 feet long and 25-30 feet in diameter, torpedo-or-cigar shaped, "similar to a B-29 fuselage", with flames coming out of its tail.[1] Only one of the plane's passengers, C.L. McKelvie, saw anything unusual. He reported seeing a "bright streak of light" that flashed by his window

    Shortly after landing in Atlanta, Georgia, Chiles and Whitted reported their sighting to the US Air Force.[1] They were interviewed by personnel from Project Sign, the first Air Force research group assigned to investigate UFO sightings. The personnel found that the two pilots did disagree on some details: Chiles claimed to see a lighted cockpit, long boom on the nose of the object, and the center section was transparent. Whitted did not see a cockpit or boom, and instead of the center section being transparent he claimed to see a series of rectangular windows. Neither pilot had heard any sound, and although some books and articles would later claim the plane had been hit by turbulence from the object, both pilots and the passenger who saw the "streak of light" stated that the plane was not affected at all by the object.[7]

    USAF Captain Edward Ruppelt would write that "according to the old-timers at ATIC (Air Technical Intelligence Center), the [Chiles-Whitted] report shook them worse than the Mantell Incident... this was the first time two reliable sources had been really close enough to a UFO to get a good look."[8] Project Sign's personnel developed a map of the object's trajectory which showed that it would have passed over Macon, Georgia.[8] When an Air Force crew chief at Robins Air Force Base near Macon reported seeing "an extremely bright light pass overhead at high speed" on the same night as the Chiles-Whitted incident, it "seemed to confirm the [Chiles-Whitted] sighting", Ruppelt wrote.[8] According to Ruppelt, as a result of the Chiles-Whitted incident and earlier sightings in 1947 and 1948, Project Sign's personnel decided to send an "Estimate of the Situation" to Air Force Chief of Staff Hoyt S. Vandenberg. The Estimate of the Situation "was a rather thick document with a black cover... stamped across the front were the words TOP SECRET."[9] Project Sign's conclusion "was that [UFOs] were interplanetary!"[10]

    However, Gen. Vandenberg rejected the Estimate of the Situation in October 1948, citing that "the report's evidence was insufficient to support its conclusions."[11] Additionally, Dr. J. Allen Hynek, an astronomer at Ohio State University and a scientific consultant to Project Sign, concluded that Chiles and Whitted had actually seen a very bright meteor. Dr. Hynek noted that "the flaming tail and sudden disappearance were consistent with the brief passage of a meteor."[12] Hynek also stated that a large number of bright meteors had been observed by amateur astronomers on the night of July 23-24. As for the rectangular windows and cockpit that Chiles and Whitted claimed to have seen on the object, Hynek wrote that "It will have to be left to the psychologists to tell us whether the immediate trail of a bright meteor could produce the subjective impression of a ship with lighted windows."[12] Although a Project Sign officer disagreed with Dr. Hynek's explanation, arguing that "it is obvious that this object was not a meteor" and that the object should remain labeled as unidentified, later researchers supported Dr. Hynek's conclusion.[13] Dr. Donald Menzel, an astronomer at Harvard University and a prominent UFO skeptic of that era, noted that July 24 "falls into a period of greatly increased meteor activity, when the Earth is moving through the Aquarid streams...the reports [from amateur astronomers] for the Southeast for [July 24] have particular interest for the Chiles-Whitted case."[13] On the night of July 24 an observer in Alabama "counted fifteen meteors in one hour's watching." Two days after the Chiles-Whitted sighting, a "huge fireball flashed over North Carolina and Tennessee."[13] Menzel wrote that "when Chiles and Whitted observed the UFO, its appearance and motion were identical with those of many other bright meteors but the pilots, startled by the sudden apparition [of the meteor] misinterpreted what they saw... there can be no doubt that Chiles and Whitted misinterpreted the appearance of an unusually bright meteor, its body glowing to white and blue incandescence... shooting off flaming gases (the "exhaust") and vaporizing from the friction of the atmosphere."[14]

    Menzel also recounted the experience of a pilot in 1959 who described a fiery object very similar to the one experienced by Chiles and Whitted, but which the pilot eventually recognized to be a brilliant meteor.[15] Philip Klass, another prominent UFO skeptic, agreed with the meteor explanation, writing that the original Project Sign conclusion that the object was an interplanetary spacecraft was "grossly in error."[16] Although Dr. James E. McDonald, a physicist at the University of Arizona and a prominent ufologist, would interview Chiles and Whitted in the 1960s and conclude that they had not seen a meteor, the US Air Force, based on the analysis of Dr. Hynek, Dr. Menzel, and others, in 1959 would label the Chiles-Whitted incident as having been caused by a fireball-type meteor.


    Some believed the July 1948 sighting revealed the presence of secret Soviet spy craft in American airspace.
    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

    Comment


    • 13 Alabama Ghosts and Jeffrey





      13 Alabama Ghosts and Jeffrey is a book first published in 1969 by folklorist Kathryn Tucker Windham and Margaret Gillis Figh. The book contains thirteen ghost stories from the U.S. state of Alabama. The book was the first in a series of seven Jeffrey books, most featuring ghost stories from a Southern state. Jeffrey in the book's title refers to a ghost that allegedly haunts Windham's home

      The foreword of the book describes how Windham came to be interested in ghost stories. It began with ghostly incidents in the Windham family home in Selma that Windham attributed to a spirit she dubbed "Jeffrey". At first, the family heard footsteps in rooms that would later be found empty. A supposed photograph of Jeffrey, included in the book, was taken inside the home. On the night the picture was made, some young people visiting the house decided to play with a Ouija board, trying to contact Jeffrey. When they developed the photos taken that night, a shadowy vaguely human-like shape was seen beside a girl in the photograph. Soon after it was taken Windham contacted Figh, who was a noted collector of ghost stories, to ask about Jeffrey. Out of that meeting, the idea of 13 Alabama Ghosts and Jeffrey was born.[3]

      In the preface to the book, Windham says that although there are many ghost stories in Alabama, she wanted to choose stories for her book that had "entertained many generations" and were "a treasured part of Southern folklore". Windham sought stories from which she could describe not only the ghost, but also the community and lifestyles of the people who first reported the haunting. Windham spends as much time describing the people and places around the ghost stories as she does the ghost itself.

      Despite being very popular in Alabama, the book attracted some controversy from certain Christians in the state who said that the book promoted beliefs incompatible with Christianity. In fact, Windham said that she had received letters from people telling her she is doomed to hell for writing the Jeffrey books.[2] In an interview with The Birmingham News, Windham responded to these claims, saying "If I'm going to hell — and I can't deny that, because it's not for me to judge — it won't be for telling ghost stories; I have far greater shortcomings than that.

      13 Alabama Ghosts and Jeffrey has been adapted into a stage musical by Don Everett Garrett and Kevin Francis Finn.[4] Kathryn Tucker Windham gave her blessing for the adaptation and saw the premiere at Red Mountain Theatre Company's Cabaret Theatre in October 2010, prior to her death. The musical is now available to schools and arts organizations from the authors.


      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

      Comment


      • Jeremiah Denton Jr.



        A native of Mobile, Mobile County, Jeremiah A. Denton Jr. (1924-2014) was the first Republican senator elected from Alabama since the end of the Reconstruction era. While in the U.S. Senate and during his career thereafter, Denton advocated positions based in his conservative Catholic upbringing, working to restrict funding for abortions, eliminate teenage pregnancy, and allow prayer in public schools. He is also widely remembered for his lengthy time spent as a prisoner of war (POW) in North Vietnam while serving in the U.S. Navy and his strong advocacy for national defense.

        Denton graduated from McGill Institute, where he excelled at sports and was voted class president. He also attended Spring Hill College in Mobile, joining the ROTC program and successfully working for an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy. He graduated with honors on June 5, 1946, and married Jane Maury, whom he met shortly after high school, the following day. The couple would have seven children.

        in the Navy, Denton served as a test pilot, flight instructor, and squadron leader. He was stationed in many places, including Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, and France as part of the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea. He also developed nuclear weapons strategies and tactics for the Navy. In 1963, he returned to school, attending the Naval War College in Newport Rhode Island and earning a masters' degree in international relations from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. in 1964. The following year in June, he was assigned to the USS Independence (CVA-62), which was deployed off the coast of North Vietnam.

        Days after assuming command of an attack squadron, on July 18, 1965, Denton led a bombing mission over North Vietnam and was shot down and captured. He spent 48 of his 91 months of imprisonment in solitary confinement, one of the longest periods of any American POW. Denton gained national attention in 1966 when he was observed blinking T-O-R-T-U-R-E in Morse Code while being interviewed by a Japanese television film crew for a North Vietnamese propaganda film. The film was smuggled out and sold by the film crew to a U.S. television network and played on national television; it confirmed that American POWs were being subjected to torture. Denton subsequently received the worst of many torture sessions that had occurred during the early years of his confinement.

        After the Paris Peace Accords were signed, Denton was on the first planeload of U.S. prisoners released February 12, 1973, and as the ranking officer, was the first to exit the plane at Clark Air Base in the Philippines. He was greeted there by Commander in Chief of the United States Pacific Command and fellow Alabamian Noel Gayler. In April 1973, he was promoted to rear admiral and after arriving in his hometown of Mobile, received a hero's welcome with one of the largest parades in the city's history. Denton then served as commandant of the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Virginia, until he retired, with numerous military decorations, from the Navy in 1977. He also wrote a book, When Hell Was in Session, recounting his POW experiences, that was made into an NBC television movie in 1979 starring Hal Holbrook. Denton strongly defended most of America's actions in Vietnam.

        Denton founded the Coalition for Decency in response to a perceived decline in America's moral values. Denton targeted the entertainment industry and was particularly distressed by the legalization of abortion and the increase in illicit drug use and the sexual revolution that had occurred during the time of his imprisonment. In 1983, he would reinvent the Coalition for Decency as the National Forum Foundation, and it would serve as a platform to promote conservative social views and increased military spending.

        In 1979, Alabama Republicans asked Denton to run for the Senate against the increasingly vulnerable incumbent, Democrat Donald W. Stewart, but he declined. Denton changed his mind and declared his candidacy for the primary, claiming he did so because he believed that Pres. Jimmy Carter's response to the recent Soviet invasion of Afghanistan was inadequate. In somewhat of an upset, he eliminated Selden and went on to defeat James Folsom Jr., who had beaten Stewart in the Democratic primary.

        Finding little time to campaign in Alabama for his reelection, Denton was narrowly defeated in the 1986 election by U.S. congressman Richard Shelby, who was then a Democrat. After leaving the Senate, Denton remained active promoting conservative views and advocating for strong national defense. He continued to lead the National Forum Foundation, which became the Admiral Jeremiah Denton Foundation in 2004

        In September 2007, Denton and his wife moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, where Jane died the following November. In 2011, he married Mary Belle Bordone.

        Denton continued to serve on a number of college and foundation boards and attend speaking engagements until his death on March 28, 2014. Denton was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, on July 22, 2014.


        "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
        Nick Saban 9/10/2016

        “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
        Nick Saban 05/29/2018

        “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
        Nick Saban 06/13/2018

        Comment


        • Satchel Paige



          Mobile native Leroy "Satchel" Paige (ca. 1906-1982) was one of the finest pitchers in baseball and certainly the most durable. Early in his career, he played for the Birmingham Black Barons and would go on to pitch in more than 2,500 games (including 153 in one season), throw more than 100 no-hitters, and play professional ball into his fifties. At least one biographer has said Paige dominated the Negro leagues as Babe Ruth had once dominated the major leagues. Most fans did not get to see him until the 1950s, when he was well past his prime, but that was enough to glimpse a great player. In 1956, at the age of 50, he was the top pitcher in the International League. In 1965, at the age of 59, he made a one-game appearance for the Kansas City Athletics, pitching three innings of shutout ball against the Boston Red Sox.

          Paige reported he was born on July 7, 1906, in Mobile, the seventh of 11 children to John Page and Lula Coleman. He was probably born earlier than that, with the date altered to make him more marketable on the baseball field.

          As a youngster, he had a part-time job carrying luggage at the local train depot, a job that gave him his lifelong nickname. Baseball became his career after a run-in with the law. In 1918, Paige received a five-year sentence in a juvenile detention center following a shoplifting charge. In his 1962 autobiography, Maybe I'll Pitch Forever, Paige credited the facility with making him a professional ballplayer.

          in 1928. On August 14, he struck out nine Kansas City Monarchs in under seven innings. He pitched shutouts—a 2-0 win and a 10-0 win—in the next two games with the Memphis Red Sox. On September 12, he pitched a complete-game, four-hit shutout in a 5-0 win over the Cuban Stars. On the last day of the season, he won both games of a doubleheader—one as a starter and the other as a reliever. In 1929, he set an unbroken league record of 164 strikeouts in a season.

          first exposure to major-league competition that same year while playing against the Babe Ruth All-Stars. In one game, he struck out 22 of the major league players. From 1930 to 1931, he played for teams in Baltimore, Nashville, and Cleveland, averaging 20-plus wins a season and 15 strikeouts per game. His reputation began to grow when he joined the Pittsburgh Crawfords in 1931 and won more than 100 games in three years. In 1933, he pitched in 41 games and won 31, with 16 shutouts.

          Paige faced major-league competition again in 1935 when he toured against a team led by pitcher Jerome "Dizzy" Dean, beating him four out of six times.

          Paige finally made it to the majors the following year, signed by the Cleveland Indians on July 7, 1948, officially his 42nd birthday. Two days later, he made a relief appearance against the St. Louis Browns, pitching two scoreless innings, making him the first African American to pitch in the American League, the fifth to play the game, and the oldest rookie in the history of the majors. Paige made his first start on August 3 against the Washington Senators, a 5-3 victory. Cleveland went on to win its first pennant in 28 years, and Paige finished the season with a 6-1 record and two shutouts. His 2.47 earned run average (ERA) was second best in the league, and he became the first African American to pitch in the World Series, in game five against the Braves.

          In 1961, he signed with Portland in the Pacific Coast League; he was 55 years old and struck out 19 batters in 25 innings. On September 25, 1965, at the age of 59, he became the oldest player ever to pitch in a major league game when he threw three scoreless innings for the Kansas City Athletics against the Boston Red Sox.

          In 1971, LeRoy "Satchel" Paige was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the first Negro League player so honored. He suffered from emphysema in his later years and died on June 8, 1982, at his home in Kansas City. He was buried in the city's Forest Hill Memorial Park Cemetery, in a special plot named Paige Island.




          "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
          Nick Saban 9/10/2016

          “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
          Nick Saban 05/29/2018

          “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
          Nick Saban 06/13/2018

          Comment


          • Lt. Gen. Harold Moore,



            Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore, whose fortitude saved most of his outnumbered battalion in 1965 in the first major battle between American and North Vietnamese troops — exploits immortalized in a book and a movie starring Mel Gibson — died at his home in Auburn, Ala February 2017. He was 94. He was buried in Fort Benning Post Cemetery on February 17, 2017 with full military honors.[51]

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Moore


            Moore is best remembered as the lieutenant colonel in command of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, at the Battle of Ia Drang in 1965, during the Vietnam War. The battle was made into the movie We Were Soldiers in 2002, which starred actor Mel Gibson as Moore; Moore was the "honorary colonel" of the regiment.

            “Unlike Custer,” General Moore said later, referring to Custer’s Last Stand in 1876 at the Little Bighorn, “we had major fire support.”

            General Moore wrote of the bloody 1965 battle in a best-selling book, “We Were Soldiers Once ... and Young,” and was played by Mel Gibson in the movie.
            "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
            Nick Saban 9/10/2016

            “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
            Nick Saban 05/29/2018

            “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
            Nick Saban 06/13/2018

            Comment


            • Hodges Meteorite Strike (Sylacauga Aerolite)




              On November 30, 1954, a meteorite crashed through the roof of a home in a then-unincorporated area near Sylacauga, Talladega County, striking resident Ann E. Hodges (1923-1972). The area was later incorporated as the town of Oak Grove. Hodges was the first person ever to have been injured by a meteorite, and the event caused a nationwide media sensation and a year-long legal battle. The meteorite, which weighs about eight and one-half pounds, is on permanent display at the Alabama Museum of Natural History at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

              Hodges was napping on her living-room couch at mid-day when the meteorite came through the ceiling, hit a console radio, and smashed into her hip. Awakened by the pain and noise, she thought the gas space heater had exploded. When she noticed a grapefruit-sized rock lying on the floor and a ragged hole in the roof, she assumed children were the culprits. Her mother, Ida Franklin, rushed outside and saw only a black cloud in the sky. Alabamians in and around the area saw the event from a different perspective, with many reporting that they had seen a fireball in the sky and heard a tremendous explosion that produced a white or brownish cloud. Most assumed it involved an airplane accident.

              Sylacauga Chief of Police W. D. Ashcraft and Sylacauga mayor Ed Howard responded to the call from the Hodges's residence. They had Ann Hodges examined by physician Moody Jacobs, who determined that although her hip and hand were swollen and painful, there was no serious damage. (He later checked her into the hospital for several days to spare her from all the excitement.) Ashcraft and Howard showed the rock to geologist George Swindel, who was conducting fieldwork in the area. He tentatively identified the object as a meteorite. That evening they turned the meteorite over to officers from Maxwell Field, Montgomery, who took it to Air Force intelligence authorities for analysis. Air Force specialists identified it as a meteorite and sent it to curators at the Smithsonian Institution, who, delighted with their windfall, declined to send it back to Alabama. Not until Alabama congressman Kenneth Roberts intervened was the meteorite finally returned to the state, where it soon became the focus of a highly public legal battle.

              By nightfall some 200 reporters and sightseers filled the Hodges's yard, and Ann's husband, Hewlett, arriving home late, was upset by the crowd. Television, radio and newspaper excitement lasted for weeks, highlighted by a very public dispute between the Hodges and Birdie Guy, who owned the home in which the Hodges lived as renters. Facing repair expenses for the damaged house, Guy was advised by her attorney that legal precedent had established that meteorites were the property of the landowner, and she sued for possession of the rock. The Hodges threatened to counter-sue for Ann's injuries, and the outraged public sided with her. Before it went to trial, cooler heads prevailed and after a modest private settlement, Guy gave up her claim on the meteorite to the Hodges. [F'ing lawyers.....]

              Ann Hodges's physical injuries healed, but she was never able to recover emotionally from her brush with celebrity. She and Hewlett separated in 1964. They both agreed that the emotional impact and disruption caused by the meteorite were contributing factors and said they wished it had never happened. Ann Hodges's health declined and in 1972, after some years as an invalid, she died. She is buried in the cemetery behind Charity Baptist Church in Hazel Green, Madison County.

              Probably the only major figure in the entire Sylacauga meteorite story to claim a satisfactory ending was Julius K. McKinney, a farmer who lived near the Hodges. On December 1, 1954, the day after Ann Hodges was struck, he discovered a second fragment of the meteorite in the middle of a dirt road. McKinney was able to sell his rock to the Smithsonian for enough to purchase a small farm and a used car. This fragment is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, but the label strangely does not acknowledge its more famous Alabama sibling. On May 22, 2010, the town of Oak Grove dedicated a historical marker at the site of the meteorite strike. In honor of the occasion, the UA Museum of Natural History sent the meteorite to the town for the day as part of the festivities.
              "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
              Nick Saban 9/10/2016

              “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
              Nick Saban 05/29/2018

              “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
              Nick Saban 06/13/2018

              Comment


              • "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                Comment


                • To commemorate Alabama's bicentennial, the genealogical and historical community has partnered with the Alabama Bicentennial Commission and the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH) to create a portal to publications documenting the story of the state's people and its past. Much of this collection will consist of the newsletters and journals produced by historical and genealogical organizations, but other relevant resources may be added as well.
                  "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                  Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                  “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                  Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                  “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                  Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                  Comment


                  • Lehman Brothers


                    Emanuel Lehman


                    Lehman Brothers, a former Fortune 500 global financial services firm, was founded in 1850 in Montgomery, Alabama, by German Jewish immigrants Henry, Emanuel, and Mayer Lehman. Starting out as a general dry goods store in Montgomery, the business evolved into a cotton brokerage firm and opened an office in New York in 1858. Its activities were interrupted by the Civil War but resumed when the Lehman brothers moved to New York, where they helped establish the Cotton Exchange. The business diversified and expanded under the leadership of members of the Lehman family until 1969. The firm was at the center of the 2007 mortgage and 2008 banking and financial crises and filed for bankruptcy in September 2008, one of the largest ever bankruptcies.

                    Henry Lehman, the first of the Lehman brothers to immigrate to the United States, arrived in Mobile in 1844 from Rimpar, Bavaria. Soon after his arrival, Henry loaded up a wagon with merchandise and spent the next year plying his goods along the Alabama River in exchange for cotton. Sometime in 1846 or 1847, he opened a dry goods store on Montgomery's Commerce Street named "H. Lehman." In 1847, his younger brother Emanuel joined him in Montgomery, and by the following year they were doing business as "H. Lehman and Brother" in a building on Court Square. When their younger brother Mayer arrived in 1850, they changed the name of the firm yet again to "Lehman Brothers." The prosperous firm was able to stock a complete supply of dry goods owing to ready credit from fellow German Jewish suppliers in New Orleans.

                    Lehmans agreed to accept the commodity from local planters in exchange for merchandise. This practice led the Lehmans to launch a separate business trading in cotton. Over the next several years, their cotton trading and brokerage business grew so much that in 1858 Emanuel Lehman opened an office in New York, which had become the nation's commodity trading center.

                    the continuation of the war interrupted the businesses in both Montgomery and New York. Mayer Lehman supported the Confederacy during the war After the war, the Lehmans moved their headquarters from Montgomery to New York. Although the firm had left Alabama, it nevertheless continued to support the state during Reconstruction; Lehman Brothers was designated to be the state's fiscal agent to help sell state bonds in 1867. The firm was also assigned to service the state's debts, interest payments, and other obligations.

                    In 1870, the Lehmans took the lead in establishing the New York Cotton Exchange, the first commodities futures trading venture. Emanuel Lehman was appointed to the first board of directors and served until 1884. In 1906, Lehman Brothers joined forces with the firm of Goldman, Sachs and moved from cotton into the investment banking business. For the next 20 years, Emanuel's son, Philip Lehman, and Henry Goldman, the dominant partner in Goldman, Sachs, formed an alliance to underwrite securities for some of the most famous names in the emerging retailing industry, including Sears, Roebuck & Co.; F. W. Woolworth Co.; May Department Stores; Gimble Brothers, Inc.; and R.H. Macy & Co.

                    the stock market crash of 1929 and the ensuing Great Depression, Lehman Brothers survived by focusing on venture capital. The firm then continued its tradition of identifying emerging industries and supporting their expansion and growth. In the 1930s, Lehman Brothers focused on radio and television; in the 1940s, on home appliance and automobile manufacturing; in the 1950s on electronics, the first computers, and the travel industry; in the 1960s and 1970s, on globalization and continued advances in electronics and information technology.

                    In 1984, Lehman Brothers was acquired by American Express and merged with its retail brokerage Shearson to form Shearson Lehman Brothers. American Express began to divest its financial services business lines in 1992 and eventually, in 1993, the firm was spun off and once again became known solely as Lehman Brothers. In 2000, Lehman celebrated its 150th anniversary.

                    The company's World Trade Center offices, located in One World Trade Center (the North Tower) were destroyed by the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, although only one employee was killed. Its global offices in Three World Financial Center were damaged beyond repair by debris from the towers.

                    Lehman Brothers entered into a settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other securities regulators, paying $80 million in financial penalties for charges regarding undue influence over the firm's research analysts by their investment banking division.

                    The firm regained its footing but was then caught up in the 2007 mortgage crisis. The value of its stock fell, and as losses of nearly $4 billion became public the following summer, the firm scrambled to raise capital. It failed to do so and was not included in the U.S. government's bailout of other troubled financial institutions, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, which provided $700 billion to restore the banking industry. Lehman executives filed for bankruptcy on September 15, 2008, and the firm's remaining subsidiaries, holdings, and real estate were sold to other investors. According to some analysts, the firm's collapse was a key catalyst for the banking crisis that necessitated the government bailout.



                    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                    Comment


                    • Morrison's Cafeterias



                      The first Morrison's was opened by J. A. Morrison in Mobile on September 4, 1920. Morrison helped develop the cafeteria dining concept, which was unique at the time and would later become synonymous with the southern United States. Initially, Morrison worked to convince both his customers and his employees that the concept was a good one, and the public soon accepted the idea of self-serve home-style cooked food offered at a modest cost. At its peak, the company expanded to more than 150 restaurants that offered meals 365 days a year with more than 100 food items prepared "homemade" daily.

                      When World War II and rationing ended, the company expanded to include several more subsidiaries, including Morrison's Merchandising Corporation, Food Service Equipment Company, Morrison's Assurance Company, Morrison's Chemical Company, and Gill Printing Company. This structure permitted Morrison's to manufacture and distribute nearly every operational need from detergent and cleanser to coffee and the stainless steel equipment used in the kitchen and interior decoration and allowed the company to become one of the most efficient in the food-service and restaurant industry.

                      By the end of the 1950s, Morrison's became the nation's largest cafeteria chain and a major food-service operator. By the 1970s Morrison's was serving more meals at hospitals, nursing homes, schools, military bases, companies, industrial plants, and private organizations than at its mainstream cafeterias. Morrison's enterprise continued to expand across the southeastern United States, along with its own public cafeteria chain.

                      As the shopping mall boom took off in postwar America, especially in the 1950s through 1970s, Morrison's boomed with it, with its cafeterias often serving as so-called anchors.

                      At its peak, the chain had 151 cafeterias, but by the late 1980s and early 1990s, restaurant-goers' tastes had begun to change. Trends began to shift from old-fashioned cafeteria chains like Morrison's to newer casual-dining restaurants like Applebee's and Morrison's own Ruby Tuesday brand. Cafeterias, as a dining concept, began to be viewed as an antiquated business model relying on an aging clientele. New generations of diners patronized the more fashionable casual dining establishments. Because of these factors and success with specialty dining concepts, in 1996 Morrison's split the company into three new firms: Ruby Tuesday, Inc., which also included the other casual dining restaurants; Morrison Health Care, which took over food service for hospitals and nursing homes; and Morrison's Fresh Cooking, which consisted of the original cafeteria chain. The cafeterias continued to struggle in the changing restaurant environment, and Morrison's Fresh Cooking sold its remaining 142 cafeterias for $46 million to long-time rival Piccadilly, Inc., based in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in April 1996. At the time, Morrison's was operating in 13 states, mostly in the southeastern United States, and employed more than 7,800 people. By the end of 1999, most of the Morrison's restaurants had been converted to Piccadilly Cafeterias, and the Morrison's name, which had been synonymous with good southern cooking, ceased to exist.
                      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

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                      • These are great, bro. Thanks for the work!

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                        • Originally posted by Pinche Cabron View Post
                          These are great, bro. Thanks for the work!
                          Yes they are. Interesting stuff. Thanks for posting.

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                          • Yes, QQB is making a strong run for poster of the year. I remember the old Britling Cafeterias in Birmingham, similar to Morrison's.

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                            • Thanks yall. I've enjoyed learning about this stuff too
                              "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                              Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                              “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                              Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                              “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                              Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by quack quack bang View Post
                                Thanks yall. I've enjoyed learning about this stuff too
                                Learning? I thought you were just writing from memory.

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