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  • Osmond Kelly Ingram



    Alabama native Osmond Kelly Ingram (1887-1917) was the first U.S. Navy enlisted man killed during World War I. Ingram died while attempting to release the depth charges aboard the USS Cassin(DD-43) before it was hit by a German torpedo on October 15, 1917. For his heroic actions, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor posthumously. Ingram and Sidney E. Manning were the only native Alabamians to receive the Medal of Honor during World War I. He was also the first enlisted man to have a U.S. Navy destroyer named in his honor; Birmingham's Kelly Ingram Park was named for him as well.

    Ingram was born on August 4, 1887, in Oneonta, Blount County, to Naomi (Bettie) and Robert Ingram, a Methodist Episcopal preacher and Confederate Army veteran. He was one of four boys. Before his father's death in 1897, the family moved to Pratt City, Jefferson County. On November 24, 1903, at the age of 16, and with his mother's consent, Ingram enlisted in the U.S. Navy. In August 1913, Ingram reenlisted and was stationed aboard the Cassin, the ship he remained on following U.S. entry into the war on April 6, 1917.

    During the war, the U.S. Navy's two most important roles were to halt the operations of German submarines, known as U-boats, and to protect American convoys of transport ships sailing to France and England. The Cassin was patrolling off the coast of Ireland on October 15, 1917, when it came in contact with German submarine U-61. Spotting a torpedo from the U-boat heading toward the Cassin's stern, or rear, where its depth charges were located, and realizing the potential damage and causalities it would inflict, Ingram tried to release the depth charges. He was not able to release the entire load before impact, and his was the only death in the ensuing explosion that blew off the rudder and severely damaged the vessel. His courageous deed and sacrifice prevented the ship from additional damage and saved many of his shipmates' lives. The Cassin was repaired, returned to service in World War I, and sold for scrap in 1934.

    In January 1918, Ingram's mother was the first recipient of funds for dependents of soldiers and sailors under the Military and Naval Insurance Act. Less than a year later, on January 11, 1919, Navy secretary Josephus Daniels informed Ingram's mother that a new destroyer was to be named after her late son, the USS Osmond Ingram (DD-255). Ingram became the first enlisted man in the U.S. Navy to have a destroyer named in his honor. It was credited with sinking a German submarine by gunfire.)

    In 1920, Daniels wrote Ingram's mother notifying her that Ingram was to be awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military decoration, posthumously. The citation noted Ingram's extraordinary heroism and sacrifice in an attempt to save the ship and his shipmates.

    West End Park in Birmingham was renamed Kelly Ingram Park in 1932 and a memorial to him was placed on the park grounds. The park served as an important site for protests in 1963 during the civil rights movement. Ingram is listed on the Wall of the Missing at the American Battle Monuments Commission Brookwood American Cemetery in Surrey, England.


    Kelly Ingram Park
    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

    Comment


    • Originally posted by quack quack bang View Post
      Jason Isbell

      Michael Jason Isbell was born in Green Hill, Lauderdale County, on February 1, 1979, to Angela Hill Barnett and Mike Isbell, who were both teenagers when he was born. He grew up in the Muscle Shoals area in an extended family that played music together at family gatherings and was immersed in music from a young age. He began playing the mandolin at age six and soon after received his first guitar, which he learned to play while being cared for at his grandparents' farm during the day. His paternal grandfather, a Pentecostal preacher, played country, bluegrass, and gospel on guitar with Isbell for hours every day and also introduced him to the music of blues legend Robert Johnson. By the time he was a sophomore, Isbell was so adept with the guitar that his mother allowed him to earn money by playing with bands at local bars. Around the same time, he formed a country cover band with his friend, songwriter Chris Tompkins. The band played at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, when Isbell was 16.
      Chris Tompkins referenced in this write-up also went to high school with Jason and me. He's written 16 #1 songs and won Grammys for two that Carrie Underwood performed. "Before He Cheats" alone made him close to $2mil in its first year.

      I'm still amazed that two people who graduated a couple years apart from that tiny hole-in-the-wall Alabama high school have won multiple Grammys. The rest of us from there have absolutely no accomplishments to our names though.


      Comment


      • Originally posted by Hannibal Lecter MD View Post

        Chris Tompkins referenced in this write-up also went to high school with Jason and me. He's written 16 #1 songs and won Grammys for two that Carrie Underwood performed. "Before He Cheats" alone made him close to $2mil in its first year.

        I'm still amazed that two people who graduated a couple years apart from that tiny hole-in-the-wall Alabama high school have won multiple Grammys. The rest of us from there have absolutely no accomplishments to our names though.

        We love you anyway, Hanni.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Hannibal Lecter MD

          Chris Tompkins referenced in this write-up also went to high school with Jason and me. He's written 16 #1 songs and won Grammys for two that Carrie Underwood performed. "Before He Cheats" alone made him close to $2mil in its first year.

          I'm still amazed that two people who graduated a couple years apart from that tiny hole-in-the-wall Alabama high school have won multiple Grammys. The rest of us from there have absolutely no accomplishments to our names though.

          Anonymity has its benefits.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

          Comment


          • I'm still waiting on anybody from my HS to amount to anything......
            "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
            Nick Saban 9/10/2016

            “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
            Nick Saban 05/29/2018

            “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
            Nick Saban 06/13/2018

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Hannibal Lecter MD View Post
              I'm still amazed that two people who graduated a couple years apart from that tiny hole-in-the-wall Alabama high school have won multiple Grammys. The rest of us from there have absolutely no accomplishments to our names though.
              I'm sure the posting will pick up once football starts.

              Comment


              • In my high school class, I'm by far and away the most successful, which is quite the indictment on my high school.
                barney_stinson_signature_by_schub3rt.jpg

                Comment


                • I don’t think we have super successful people either. A few are engineers and the two smartest chicks are stay at home moms. Nothing wrong with that, just not a glamorous accomplishment

                  Comment


                  • Alabama Peach Industry




                    Peach growing in Alabama dates back to the mid-nineteenth century, and since that time the peach industry has provided growers with a viable source of income and alternatives to such traditional staples as cotton, corn, and other agricultural products. More than two-thirds of the cultivation has been confined to Chilton County, but the peach has become the state's leading commercial fruit. The utilized yield for Alabama peach orchards in 2015 exceeded 11 million pounds and produced $6,182,000 from about 1,500 acres.

                    Peach growing thrived in the mid-Atlantic seaboard and in Georgia long before it came to Alabama. The earliest reference to peach cultivation in the state is from 1850, when Dr. H. V. Wooten of Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, reported planting five dozen peach trees. Soon after the Civil War Irishman John Howard Parnell, brother of famous Irish leader Charles Stewart Parnell, established a farm of nearly 1,500 acres in Chambers County, much of which he devoted to peaches. Parnell harvested his first crop in 1872 and eventually produced enough peaches to market his produce out of state. He also processed peach brandy for local consumption. Other early peach producers included Benjamin Winston Walker, who owned a plantation in Macon County, and politician Reuben F. Kolb of Barbour County, whose orchard of 2,000 trees yielded more than a bushel per tree. Kolb sold his produce for five to 20 dollars per bushel in northeastern markets during the 1880s.

                    The Alabama peach industry intensified with the arrival of Scandinavian immigrants Theodore Thorson and John Peterson, who established the settlement of Thorsby in 1895 in Chilton County. Peach trees were set as early as 1898, and the hilly landscape and climate seemed ideal for their cultivation.

                    Although Georgian P.C. Smith was the first horticulturist to raise peaches commercially in Chilton County, it was the Scandinavians and other Thorsby growers who established a significant number of orchards, vineyards, and berry fields. Elberta was the variety of choice at the time, and Thorsby's farmers set between 135 and 170 trees on their 10-acre plots, netting about 75 cents per crate (slightly more than a present-day bushel). After several successful seasons, the growers founded the Thorsby Fruit and Truck Growers Association and a cannery that employed 150 workers to promote and market their produce.

                    with the introduction of pesticides and crop diversification encouraged by the ravages of the boll weevil on cotton, the state's peach yield slowly began to increase. Total production in 1909, the earliest on record, was 1,417,000 bushels, reaching 2,640,000 by 1915, with an average annual output of 1,916,714 bushels selling at an average price of $.82 per bushel between 1909 and 1915.

                    For the next several decades, Alabama's peach output fell short of 1909–1915 averages. Yearly figures fluctuated greatly, but five-year averages showed little change from pre-war levels with 926,200 bushels (1920–24), 920,400 (1925–29), 1,401,200 (1930–34), and 1,494,000 (1935–39). Although the price per bushel started at a postwar high of $2.50 in 1920, five-year averages show a steady decline from $1.74 in the early 1920s to only $.95 in the late 1930s and a corresponding decline in total production values from $1,578,600 to $1,383,600 during the interwar period. Although peaches were the state's leading tree fruit, accounting for about 6.33 percent of Alabama's cash farm receipts (cotton was first at 65.5 percent), they trailed strawberries (at 6.66 percent). In 1938, a Chilton County extension service report stated that strawberries remained the principal truck crop, valued at $65,000, but noted that many thousands of peach trees had been planted during the previous three years in the area.

                    The resulting bounty from these efforts soon brought about a resurgence of Alabama's peach industry during the post-war years. In addition, Chilton County gained permanent notoriety as the peach capital of Alabama, producing more than 65 percent of the state's peaches.

                    The most immediate development was the staging of the first Peach Festival in Thorsby in 1947 after a bumper crop that year. The celebration featured a parade replete with a peach queen, speeches by dignitaries, picnics, peach-judging contests, concerts, orchard tours, a baseball game, and dance. The prize-winning peaches, grown by W. H. Lenoir, were delivered by Alabama's senators to President Harry Truman. The festival moved to Clanton in 1952 and was later expanded to include Junior and Little Miss Peach contests, a 10-kilometer race, a peach cook-off, an art exhibit, a classic car show, and fireworks. The festival motto, "Chilton County Peaches are Tops," eventually became a statewide slogan

                    Of the many risks run by peach growers, bad weather is foremost, and it nearly destroyed the 1996 crop. Competition from California, which produces more than 75 percent of the nation's peaches, remains a concern as well. Yields per acre sometimes triple those in Alabama. But labor has become the biggest problem. Since the 1980s American workers have all but disappeared, and more than 90 percent of the workforce is migrant. Growers must not only pay a higher-than- minimum wage (dictated by the U.S. Department of Labor) but must transport workers from Mexico, pay border fees, provide housing, utilities, and workers' compensation, and offer two weekly shopping trips. In return, migrants must work long hours—often seven days a week from April to September. Trees are also a major investment. Growers can expect an individual tree to produce for 11 seasons, but the key to maintaining success is to plant many (perhaps 20) varieties with staggered ripening times in order to ensure a steady flow of peaches to markets for as long as possible and to maximize the efforts of the labor force. Few Elbertas are grown anymore, but its first fruit (usually ripening around July 10) remains the gold standard by which the first harvests of all other varieties are timed for marketing.

                    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                    Comment


                    • Forest Products Industry




                      Because Alabama is one of the most heavily forested states in the nation, the forestry products industry has played a large role in the state's economy. Developing first as the timber industry and to a lesser extent naval stores (turpentine and other pine-resin products), the forest products industry came to include pulp and paper production in the twentieth century. In recent years, international competition has caused many companies to divest themselves of their lands and has pushed forest management practices and the forest products industry in new directions.

                      The region's pre-historic Native American peoples used wood for constructing homes, towns, and ceremonial structures. By the time whites began settling in what is now Alabama, however, the Native American population had been dramatically reduced by disease, and the forests had largely recovered from their activities. It is estimated that in 1630, longleaf and other pines, as well as a variety of hardwoods, covered some 29,540,000 acres in Alabama.

                      White settlers came to Alabama primarily to farm; thus, they generally viewed forests as obstacles, with little interest in their economic potential. Settlers cleared land for farming, either by chopping down the trees or girdling them and then burning the fallen timber.

                      One of the first water-powered sawmills in Alabama was built by Thomas Mendenhall on a tributary of the Conecuh River. The Conecuh was a convenient route for rafting rough-hewn pine timbers down to the Escambia River and into Pensacola Bay, where they were sold for export. Soon after Mendenhall established his mill, several other families who would become important in the Alabama lumber industry settled in the area. The community came to be known as Brewton and grew into one of Alabama's lumbering centers.By the middle of the nineteenth century, Mobile had a burgeoning lumber industry that was exporting nearly seven million feet of sawed lumber to various markets, including Cuba, Europe, South America, and even the California gold fields.

                      The forests also provided raw materials for ship-building, as well as the tar, pitch, resin, and turpentine needed to maintain ships.

                      Large-scale logging and lumbering involving railroads and steam-powered logging equipment and mills did not become widespread in Alabama until the late nineteenth century. Thus, despite the absence of knowledge about silviculture and forest management, early loggers and lumbermen did not cause extensive damage to forests.

                      By the late nineteenth century, Alabama, like the rest of the South, was in the midst of a timber industry boom. A huge influx of immigrants, the movement of people into the West, and the massive growth of the nation's cities brought dramatic increases in demand for wood products. Railroads needed wood to make ties, cars, and buildings, and most new dwellings in the nation were made largely from wood. Farmers who moved to the generally treeless western prairies had to import wood to construct barns, fences, and other structures. As the southern lumber boom began, labor in the industry was being transformed. Early loggers and lumbermen transported logs from the woods to the mills using animal-drawn carts and wagons and river rafts. In the late nineteenth century individual workers used or operated tools and machines that made them vastly more productive. Two-man, cross-cut saws replaced axes for felling trees, and steam-powered skidders and loaders proliferated. These inventions greatly increased the speed with which felled trees were dragged to rail lines and loaded onto flat cars for transport to the mills on narrow-gauge railroads.

                      During the late nineteenth century, many large northern companies came South, clear-cut vast amounts of timber, and then moved on to other regions. In Alabama, however, some of the largest lumber companies were owned by local residents. Among these were the McGowin family of the W. T. Smith Lumber Company. This company was established in Butler County in the 1880s and then acquired and renamed by Autauga County and Birminghamlumberman W. T. Smith, who had started his own company in the 1850s. The firm was purchased by the McGowins in 1905, and they operated the company until 1966, when they sold their holdings to Union Camp. T. R. Miller established the T. R. Miller Mill Company with a partner on Cedar Creek near Brewton. By 1891, Miller co-owned with David Blacksher and Alex McGowin 35,000 acres of timber, a large sawmill, a planing mill, five dry kilns, and 30 miles of log ditches. By 1913, the T. R. Miller firm employed more than 800 people and owned some 200,000 acres.

                      several outsiders established operations in the state, including the Kaul family of Pennsylvania, who began to acquire Alabama timberland and milling operations in 1889. By 1911, the company had more than 80,000 acres of timberland and constructed a manufacturing complex and company town at Kaulton near Tuscaloosa.

                      During the early twentieth century, as more and more forests were clearcut or otherwise depleted. Public calls for conservation, including responsible forest management practices, began to appear. Public calls for conservation, including responsible forest management practices, began to appear. Alabama had no institutions that offered instruction in sustainable forestry, and many of Alabama's trained foresters came from Yale University, in Connecticut, or from neighboring state schools such as Louisiana State University and the University of Georgia. Yale University School of Forestry initiated spring and summer field schools for their students hosted by the Kaul Lumber Company, the T. R. Miller Mill Company, and other Alabama firms, and important relationships developed as the companies hired Yale Forestry School graduates and employed faculty members as consultants.

                      From the late nineteenth century through World War I, the South was the nation's leading lumber producer, peaking in 1901, when southern producers supplied one-third of the nation's lumber. By 1910, Alabama had 1,819 lumber manufacturers that employed 22,409 workers and turned out products valued at $26,057,662. A decade later, Alabama had 1,774 sawmills that employed 22,097 workers and production valued at $61,317,0000. Alabama produced more than one billion board feet of softwoods and hardwoods, with yellow pine accounting for most of the output. The state ranked seventh nationally in lumber production, but, by the mid-1920s many companies had exhausted their lands and moved on. By 1931, Alabama was down to 320 lumbering establishments.

                      With forestry on the decline in the state, the federal government stepped in during the 1930s and began to acquire large tracts of largely cutover land for conservation purposes; these areas would become Alabama's four national forests. F

                      Between 1925 and 1931, International Paper's Southern Kraft division purchased three kraft mills and built three more, including a massive facility and headquarters at Mobile. The Illinois-based Westervelt family established the Gulf States Paper Company at Holt, Tuscaloosa County, in 1927. The industry was also attracted by Alabama's cheap, abundant, and generally non-union labor force. By the early 1950s, seven wood-pulp mills were operating in the state.

                      By the 1990s, Alabama had more acres of trees than at the time of early European exploration and settlement, although these "forests" were now comprised almost exclusively of one or two species of pine. This overabundance of pines led to a wood surplus that depressed prices. In addition, the forest products industries had become increasingly international, and wood from other countries began flooding the U.S. market. Forest products companies began harvesting trees from other countries that were not subject to American taxes and environmental protections, a trend that continues with the expansion of the global economy.

                      As a result, forest land in Alabama and other southern states lost much of its value, and companies became attractive targets for corporate mergers and takeovers. Assured of an adequate wood supply from non-industrial private lands and foreign producers, companies moved quickly to divest their landholdings. In Alabama, Georgia-Pacific Corporation, International Paper Company, and MeadWestvaco, among others, sold off most of their lands. The degree of change of ownership and of ownership type is virtually unprecedented in the history of U.S. timberland.






                      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Stan View Post
                        I don’t think we have super successful people either. A few are engineers and the two smartest chicks are stay at home moms. Nothing wrong with that, just not a glamorous accomplishment
                        Gary Hollingsworth went to my school in up until 6th grade.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Big Balls View Post

                          Gary Hollingsworth went to my school in up until 6th grade.
                          The originator of the Bama bangs.

                          Comment


                          • hahahahha


                            Comment


                            • I am trying to think of anybody famous or really successful that went to my high school. All I can come up with is the girl that was a Playboy bunny at the mansion in LA.

                              Comment


                              • Inland Shrimp in Alabama



                                The Alabama shrimp farming industry, centered in west-central Greene County, began in 1999. As of 2007, the state had four active producers with a total of 25 ponds spread over 75 acres. Total production in Alabama has recently been around 350,000 pounds, with sales of live shrimp totaling more than $1 million.

                                he farming of marine or saltwater shrimp, specifically Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), is a form of aquaculture, which is defined as the farming and husbandry of freshwater and marine organisms. Inland marine shrimp farming in Alabama is possible because of the presence of two deep, ancient deposits of underground saltwater known as saltwater aquifers. These aquifers, the Gordo and McShan formations, yield high concentrations of dissolved minerals, including chloride, the main constituent of seawater. This water is generally too salty for human consumption but can be used for aquaculture to grow marine shrimp, flounder, and possibly even oysters. Fishproducers in Sumter and Greene County have used this water for decades in the production of farm-raised catfish. The high concentrations of chloride have a therapeutic effect on the fish. Farmers dig four to six inch water wells and pump the water into tanks and ponds.

                                Marine shrimp culture in Alabama began in 1999 in Greene County when commercial catfish farmers Rafe Taylor and Richard Odom Jr. began exploring alternative species that had a greater profit potential than catfish. Having heard about inland shrimp farming in other parts of the world such as Thailand, they stocked two former catfish ponds with baby shrimp. Over the summer, the mosquito-sized baby shrimp, called post-larvae, grew into commercial-grade jumbo shrimp. This particular crop averaged almost 16 shrimp to the pound. Amazed by the fact that shrimp did not need full-strength seawater right out of the ocean to grow, the men built new ponds, dug new wells, and expanded their production acreage the following year.

                                Water chemistry of inland ponds varies from site to site, and commercial success depends on careful analysis of water samples. Current research is focusing on problems relating to ammonia and nitrite levels. Shrimp, unlike farmed catfish, have lower tolerances for ammonia and nitrite. As of 2007, scientists at the Alabama Cooperative Extension System were recommending that prospective shrimp producers test their water with Pacific white shrimp in aquariums before investing in ponds. Pacific white shrimp are cultured in aquariums with natural seawater, diluted seawater, and inland salty well water. The water may need to be treated with the above fertilizers. Researchers are still looking at what role minor elements in seawater play in the growth of shrimp in inland waters. This bioassay work is recommended before large amounts of money are invested in a shrimp farm.

                                The average start-up cost for a shrimp farm of between 25 and 50 acres is approximately $10,000 per acre. The major portion of this cost is pond construction. Shrimp ponds have to be designed so that the entire crop is removed when the pond is drained. The ponds must drain relatively quickly (compared with catfish ponds, which are rarely drained), and they must drain completely or large amounts of shrimp will get stranded in pockets of water out in the pond. Other capital expenses include well drilling, electrical installations for aerators, water monitoring equipment, feed bins, and coolers to hold harvested shrimp. Ponds greater than five acres present major challenges in harvesting and marketing. Shrimp have to be chilled rapidly to between 35 and 40°F after harvest to maintain quality. Large harvests can tax the available labor and resources on small farms.

                                Shrimp production season generally runs from May to October. Post-larvae may be purchased as early as April, but they then must be acclimated in greenhouses or heated indoor enclosures until pond temperatures rise above 68°F. Shrimp farmers must acclimate young post- larvae for several days to a week before stocking their ponds in late May and early June. The acclimation period allows the shrimp to slowly adjust to the lower salinity of the water in Alabama compared with the hatchery water. Shrimp are fed a diet of commercial shrimp feed between one and four times a day depending on their growth rate. During the summer production season, farmers sample their stock weekly with cast nets to see if the animals are growing at the optimal rate of one and a half to two grams per week. Feeding regimes are adjusted based on these growth rates.

                                Shrimp producers in Alabama market their shrimp in several different ways. Some sell all their shrimp directly to the public right on the farm. They advertise the dates of their harvests and people from all over the state bring their ice chests and fill them with fresh shrimp. Other producers ship their chilled shrimp to processors for de-heading, shelling, deveining, packaging and warehousing. Some sell the packaged shrimp to locally owned restaurants and supermarkets and keep some on the farm for roadside sales. Farmers have not had success in marketing their shrimp to large-scale national food wholesalers because of price competition from producers in other areas. Large wholesalers that deliver to national chain restaurants can purchase imported shrimp from Asia at a cheaper price. Alabama producers claim that their shrimp is of higher quality but price often outweighs quality among those who purchase shrimp by the thousands of pounds. As of 2015, the cost of producing Alabama inland shrimp was around $2.30 per pound. Asian shrimp can be purchased wholesale for between $2.25 and $2.45 per pound, thus leaving little margin for profit for an Alabama producer. Producers that sell shrimp on the farm can get $3.50 to $5.00 per pound, depending on the size of the shrimp.

                                Alabama currently lags behind other big shrimp-producing states. Texas leads the nation in production, with 2,000 acres and 6 million pounds of production. Texas is dwarfed, however, by the country of Ecuador, which raises more than 100 million pounds of shrimp annually. Despite this, the future of inland shrimp farming in Alabama looks promising. There are certainly ample resources in terms of land and water for expansion.
                                "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                                Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                                “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                                Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                                “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                                Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                                Comment

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