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  • Bobby Eaton



    Robert Lee Eaton (born August 14, 1958) is an American retired professional wrestler, who made his debut in 1976.[1] Eaton is most famous for his work in tag teams, especially his days as one-half of The Midnight Express. Under the management of Jim Cornette, Eaton originally teamed with Dennis Condrey and, later on, with Stan Lane. He has also worked with a number of other tag team partners, including Koko B. Ware, Steve Keirn, and "Lord" Steven Regal.


    Growing up in Huntsville, Alabama, Eaton was a fan of professional wrestling, especially the NWA Mid-America professional wrestling promotion. This promotion was operated by Nick Gulas, who staged wrestling shows in the Alabama and Tennessee region. Eaton's first involvement in the sport came at the age of 13, while attending Chapman Middle School, when he helped set up wrestling rings in his hometown.[3] He later trained under Tojo Yamamoto to become a professional wrestler


    n May 1976, at the age of 17, Eaton made his debut in NWA Mid-America. He entered his first match, a loss to Bearcat Wright, as a last-minute substitute for Wright's absent opponent.[3] He quickly became a regular in Mid-America and continued to train with the more experienced wrestlers. Before long, fans, as well as promoter Nick Gulas, noticed Eaton's athleticism and showmanship. Gulas decided to "promote" Eaton up the ranks of NWA Mid-America, giving him matches later in the show, closer to the main event


    In 1978, Eaton teamed with Leapin' Lanny Poffo (brother of the more well-known "Macho Man" Randy Savage), and together they won the NWA Mid-America Tag Team Championship from Gypsy Joe and Leroy Rochester. It was Eaton's first title win, and he and Poffo held it for a little over a month. Eaton went on to form a team, known as The Jet Set, with George Gulas, Nick Gulas's son. Together, Eaton and Gulas held the tag team title three times.[5] During their time as a team, the two were involved in a storyline feud with Terry Gordy and Michael Hayes before Gordy and Hayes became famous under the name The Fabulous Freebirds.[4][6]

    At the end of 1979, Eaton turned heel (bad guy) for the first time in his career by joining Tojo Yamamoto's group of wrestlers, whom the fans hated

    When Nick Gulas' wrestling promotion closed due to dwindling ticket sales, Eaton briefly wrestled for Georgia Championship Wrestling, even capturing the National Television Championship. Before long Eaton returned closer to home, working for promoter Jerry Jarrett's Continental Wrestling Association (CWA), which was centered in Memphis, Tennessee.

    Soon after Eaton joined Mid-South Wrestling under promoter Bill Watts, he became part of the Midnight Express. To complement the nickname "Lover Boy" Dennis, Eaton was nicknamed "Beautiful" Bobby, a nickname he still uses when wrestling. began a long series of matches against The Rock 'n' Roll Express (Ricky Morton and Robert Gibson) which ran well into the 1990s and spanned several wrestling promotions.[4] The two teams feuded throughout 1984 in Mid-South Wrestling before the Midnight Express left the promotion. The Midnight Express versus Rock 'n' Roll Express series of matches were so well received by the fans that independent promoters all over the United States still book those two teams against each other today, 20 years after the rivalry started


    Eaton is often regarded as one of the nicest people in the wrestling business, even though he wrestled as a heel for a majority of his career. In his 1999 book Have a Nice Day, Mick Foley praised Eaton as being one of the most underrated superstars in the business, and its nicest, commenting that "it was damn near impossible to pay for anything with Bobby around, though I will confess to not trying that hard"

    Eaton is married to Bill Dundee's daughter, Donna. When they first started dating, they had to keep the relationship secret from her father, as her father had forbidden her from dating the wrestlers he was booking. When Dundee found out she was dating Eaton, he relented because Eaton was such a nice guy.[3] Eaton and Donna have three children: Dustin, Dylan, and Taryn. Dylan is a professional wrestler.[

    In September, 2006 it was reported that Eaton was hospitalized after suffering a heart attack.[36] Later, after being released from the hospital, Eaton released a statement saying that he did not have a heart attack but was diagnosed with high blood pressure with a hint of diabetes.[37]Since then, he has suffered with several health issues, especially cardiac problems which have seen him hospitalized on several occasions.[38][39][40] In June 2013, Eaton underwent successful surgery to have a pacemaker inserted.[41]

    On August 5, 2016, Eaton was reported missing by his sister Debbie. According to Tommy Dreamer, Eaton was last seen in Atlanta, where a photo, which has since been deleted, showed him eating at the airport, and had no phone and was confused. A day later, Eaton was found safe. Wrestler Matt Sigmon posted a photo on his Twitter account of himself and Bobby Eaton

    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

    Comment


    • W. C. Handy





      William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 – March 28, 1958) was a composer and musician,[1] known as the Father of the Blues.[2] An African American, Handy was one of the most influential songwriters in the United States.[3] One of many musicians who played the distinctively American blues music, Handy did not create the blues genre but was the first to publish music in the blues form, thereby taking the blues from a regional music style (Delta blues) with a limited audience to a new level of popularity.[3]

      Handy was an educated musician who used elements of folk music in his compositions. He was scrupulous in documenting the sources of his works, which frequently combined stylistic influences from various performers.

      Handy was born in Florence, Alabama, the son of Elizabeth Brewer and Charles Barnard Handy. His father was the pastor of a small church in Guntersville, a small town in northeast central Alabama. Handy wrote in his 1941 autobiography, Father of the Blues, that he was born in a log cabin built by his grandfather William Wise Handy, who became an African Methodist Episcopalminister after the Emancipation Proclamation. The log cabin of Handy's birth has been preserved near downtown Florence.

      Handy's father believed that musical instruments were tools of the devil.[4] Without his parents' permission, Handy bought his first guitar, which he had seen in a local shop window and secretly saved for by picking berries and nuts and making lye soap.

      In September 1892, Handy travelled to Birmingham, Alabama, to take a teaching exam. He passed it easily and gained a teaching job at the Teachers Agriculture and Mechanical College in Huntsville.[7] Learning that it paid poorly, he quit the position and found employment at a pipe works plant in nearby Bessemer.

      In his time off from his job, he organized a small string orchestra and taught musicians how to read music. He later organized the Lauzetta Quartet. When the group read about the upcoming World's Fair in Chicago, they decided to attend. To pay their way, they performed odd jobs along the way. They arrived in Chicago only to learn that the World's Fair had been postponed for a year. Next they headed to St. Louis, Missouri, but found working conditions were bad.

      Handy went to Evansville, Indiana. He played the cornet in the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. In Evansville, he joined a successful band that performed throughout neighboring cities and states. His musical endeavors were varied: he sang first tenor in a minstrel show, worked as a band director, choral director, cornetist, and trumpeter. At the age of 23, he became the bandmaster of Mahara's Colored Minstrels.

      Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes (AAMC) (now Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University), in Normal, Alabama, hired Handy to teach music. He became a faculty member in September 1900 and taught through much of 1902.

      After a dispute with AAMC President Council, Handy resigned his teaching position to return to the Mahara Minstrels and tour the Midwest and Pacific Northwest. In 1903 he became the director of a black band organized by the Knights of Pythias in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Handy and his family lived there for six years. In 1903, while waiting for a train in Tutwiler, in the Mississippi Delta, Handy had the following experience:
      A lean loose-jointed Negro had commenced plunking a guitar beside me while I slept...As he played, he pressed a knife on the strings of the guitar in a manner popularized by Hawaiian guitarists who used steel bars...The singer repeated the line three times, accompanying himself on the guitar with the weirdest music I had ever heard.[8][9]
      About 1905, while playing a dance in Cleveland, Mississippi, Handy was given a note asking for "our native music".[10] He played an old-time Southern melody but was asked if a local colored band could play a few numbers. Three young men with a battered guitar, mandolin, and a worn-out bass walked onto the stage.[11][12] Research in 2009 for the Mississippi Blues Trail identified the leader of the band in Cleveland as Prince McCoy.[13]
      They struck up one of those over and over strains that seem to have no beginning and certainly no ending at all. The strumming attained a disturbing monotony, but on and on it went, a kind of stuff associated with [sugar] cane rows and levee camps. Thump-thump-thump went their feet on the floor. It was not really annoying or unpleasant. Perhaps "haunting" is the better word.[11][14]

      Regarding the "three-chord basic harmonic structure" of the blues, Handy wrote that the "(tonic, subdominant, dominant seventh) was that already used by Negro roustabouts, honky-tonk piano players, wanderers and others of the underprivileged but undaunted class from Missouri to the Gulf, and had become a common medium through which any such individual might express his personal feeling in a sort of musical soliloquy."[19] He noted, "In the folk blues the singer fills up occasional gaps with words like 'Oh, lawdy' or 'Oh, baby' and the like. This meant that in writing a melody to be sung in the blues manner one would have to provide gaps or waits.

      His published musical works were groundbreaking because of his ethnicity and founded Pace and Handy Sheet Music. In 1917, he and his publishing business moved to New York City, where he had offices in the Gaiety Theatre office building in Times Square

      On March 28, 1958, Handy died of bronchial pneumonia at Sydenham Hospital in New York City[33] Over 25,000 people attended his funeral in Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church. Over 150,000 people gathered in the streets near the church to pay their respects. He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx



      St Louis Blues

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gpp75gQ-T6Y

      Beale St Blues

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0eObgNiKvo

      Memphis Blues

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6w88NLQTPS4
      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

      Comment


      • Polly Holliday



        Polly Dean Holliday (born July 2, 1937) is an American actress who has appeared on stage, television and in film. She is best known for her portrayal of sassy waitress Florence Jean "Flo" Castleberry on the 1970s sitcom Alice, which she reprised in its short-lived spin-off, Flo. Her character's tagline of "Kiss my grits!" remains perhaps the most memorable line associated with the series Alice.

        Holliday was born in Jasper, Alabama, the daughter of Ernest Sullivan Holliday, a truck driver, and Velma Mabell Holliday (née Cain).[1] She grew up in Childersburg and Sylacauga, where her brother Doyle's boyhood friend Jim Nabors lived. Prior to acting, Holliday worked as a piano teacher in her native Alabama, and then in Florida. She began her acting career as a member of the Asolo Theatre Company in Sarasota, Florida, where she stayed for 10 years. Holliday is an Episcopalian who sang in the St. Andrews Episcopal Choir in Mobile, Alabama[2] and in January 2010 she appeared as herself in an official advertisement campaign for the Episcopal Church[3]

        In 1976 Holliday was cast — in what would be her major break — as sassy, man-hungry waitress Flo Castleberry on the American sitcom Alice. Her character coined the popular catchphrase, "Kiss my grits!" The phrase became part of the American vocabulary. Holliday starred in Alice from 1976 to 1980, and then moved to her own short-lived spin-off show, Flo, in which Flo left her residence in Arizona and moved back home. The show was successful during its abbreviated first season, but ratings declined during the following season due to a time change, and it was canceled in 1981.

        Holliday also made appearances on television shows such as The Golden Girls, where she played Rose Nylund's blind sister Lily, in a recurring role as Jill Taylor's mother on Home Improvement, and a regular on The Client.

        Holliday's notable roles in films include All the President's Men, Mrs. Doubtfire, the 1998 remake of The Parent Trap and her role as Mrs. Ruby Deagle in the 1984 box office smash Gremlins, for which she won the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress.

        On the Broadway stage, she has appeared in revivals of Arsenic and Old Lace (1986) as Martha Brewster, one of the dotty, homicidal, sweet old aunties; Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1990), for which she was nominated for a Tony for her portrayal of "Big Mama"; and Picnic (1994). She also appeared in the 1998 remake of The Parent Trap as the director of Camp Walden. In 2000, she appeared at Lincoln Center in a revival of Arthur Laurents's The Time of the Cuckoo.

        In 2000, she was inducted into the Alabama Stage and Screen Hall of Fame


        "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
        Nick Saban 9/10/2016

        “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
        Nick Saban 05/29/2018

        “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
        Nick Saban 06/13/2018

        Comment


        • A little late on this post.....
          WWII Army Casualties: Alabama

          Table of Contents by StateAlabama Index | Descriptive Information | More World War II links
          "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
          Nick Saban 9/10/2016

          “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
          Nick Saban 05/29/2018

          “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
          Nick Saban 06/13/2018

          Comment


          • Eli Gold



            Eli Gold (born December 15, 1953) is an American sportscaster. Gold is best known as the radio voice for the Alabama Crimson Tide football team, along with Tom Roberts, as part of the Crimson Tide Sports Network since 1988. He has also been the host of NASCAR Live on the Motor Racing Network since 1982. He formerly called play-by-play for Arena Football League's coverage on TNN and NBC and currently calls college football and NFL games for Sports USA Radio Network.

            born on December 15, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York. He began his broadcasting career in 1972 as a weekend sports reporter for the Mutual Broadcasting System. called New York home until he was twenty-three years old. He lost his father when he was very young and he says, "Regretfully, I didn’t know him that well". Gold says that growing up in New York impacted his broadcasting career because there were over two hundred radio stations in the area. He worked at WOR and WNEW, where he learned the business. His high school was not the usual high school that the normal kids go to, instead he went from 7 am until 10:41 AM then he would go to work. In the eighth grade he knew he wanted to be a sportscaster. He began his career in 1972

            His first specialty was announcing ice hockey for the Eastern, North American, Southern, American, Central, and the National Hockey Leagues. In the NHL, Gold announced games for the 1979–80 St. Louis Blues

            In 1976, Gold became a member of the NASCAR’s Motor Racing network

            Beginning at the 1988 football season, Gold became the radio broadcaster for the University of Alabama Crimson Tide football and also basketball teams. He led the shows that are called "The Tide" and "Hey Coach" which had the coaches from both the basketball and football coaches called in and talked to Gold. Eli Gold is known as the voice of the Alabama Crimson Tide and that is how many people recognize his accomplishments.

            Along with the Alabama Crimson Tide, Gold was called by the CBS Sports to broadcast the play by play-on college basketball regional show, which included the Universities of Georgia and South Carolina.

            Eli was the first play-by-play announcer for the University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB) Blazers basketball team and he was there for six years. Eli also spent four years as the broadcaster for the Birmingham Barons baseball team. While he was working with the baseball team he was named the Southern League’s Broadcaster of the Year in 1983. He was also voted "Alabama Sportscaster of the Year" four times by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriter Association.

            Gold moved to Birmingham, Alabama to broadcast the Birmingham Bulls hockey team of the World Hockey Association. He created Birmingham's first local sports call-in show, Calling All Sports on WERC which became a staple of Birmingham sports radio for 20 years. He eventually rose to the position of Sports Director for what was then that market's ABC affiliate, WBRC where he anchored evening news sports segments and hosted "Sports Talk with Eli", a weekly call-in show. From 2002 to 2004 he hosted a daily sports talk show also called Calling All Sports on WJOX-AM in Birmingham.

            Gold has also performed announcing duties for the Birmingham Barons AA baseball team and the UAB Blazers men's basketball team. He has been voted "Alabama Sportscaster of the Year" four times by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. He has also won the same honor from the Associated Press and United Press International.

            On August 30, 2011, Gold returned to the daily radio airwaves as co-host of a morning drive time (6am-9am CT) sports call-in show with former Auburn quarterback Stan White on WZNN in Birmingham.

            beginning of the 2000 season, Gold became TNN’s "voice" of the Arena Football league

            Fall of 2003, Gold became a member of the SportsUSA Radio’s Network coverage of the NFL. Gold handles the play by play of one NFL game a week

            Gold currently resides in Birmingham, as well as Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina with his wife Claudette and daughter Elise. Gold is also a part owner of Nino's Italian Restaurant, which is located in Pelham, Alabama. He also has a wing sauce named after him at Baumhowers Wings restaurant, which is owned by former Alabama Defensive Lineman, Bob Baumhower. Gold is Jewish;[5] he once told an interviewer that he was thrilled that a "Jewish kid from Brooklyn with zero athletic talent would make it into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame."[6]

            Gold has won the Alabama Sportscaster of the Year 4 times. He won these titles by being voted by the National Sportscaster and Sportswriter Association. He has also been named the Alabama Sportscaster of the Year by the Associated Press twice and also was voted the Alabama Sportscaster of the Year by the United Press International.
            "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
            Nick Saban 9/10/2016

            “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
            Nick Saban 05/29/2018

            “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
            Nick Saban 06/13/2018

            Comment


            • CHRIS STEWART



              Chris Stewart has been a broadcaster since 1988, and is in his 17th season as the University of Alabama’s men’s basketball play-by-play announcer for the Crimson Tide Sports Network.

              In addition to his role as the voice of Crimson Tide Basketball, Stewart also serves as the broadcast host for CTSN’s radio coverage of Crimson Tide Football and as the television host of “The Nick Saban Show” and “The Avery Johnson Show”.

              Stewart is also the radio play-by-play announcer for Bama Baseball, having followed the Tide on the diamond since the 2000 season.

              Prior to taking over the Alabama basketball play-by-play job, the Fairfield native also spent eight seasons as the radio announcer for Birmingham-Southern College. He described the action for two NAIA national championships won by the Panthers – the 1995 men’s basketball title, as well as the 2001 baseball championship.

              A 1992 graduate of the University of Montevallo, Stewart was honored with the school’s 2009 Alumni Achievement Award.

              On five occasions (2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2016) he has also been named “Alabama Sportscaster of the Year” by the National Sports Media Association.

              Chris is married to the former Christy Carmichael and has three children, Anne (18), Parker (13), & Hudson (7).

              The radio play-by-play voice for Alabama basketball and baseball had suffered a stroke sometime in the early-morning hours on April 16. It had taken doctors some time to diagnose Stewart, then 47, as a stroke victim. Hours had already passed when the neurologist prepared to operate.


              “Ordinarily the surgeon and physician would go talk to the family after they’ve done an initial diagnosis,” Stewart said. ”... But he sends his chief nurse, and says ‘Tell her that if she insists on me coming and laying out what the situation is (before surgery), then I’ll do it. But the truth is her husband doesn’t have that time. We can’t afford that time for him.’”


              Stewart is now recovering at his home in Hoover a little more than two months after the stroke. He still requires rest and his memory can be spotty at times. Those effects should wear off with time. His left eye droops slightly, though that can be fixed through therapy. He suffered no paralysis,

              https://www.tuscaloosanews.com/news/...llowing-stroke



              footnote -

              Even as a small child, Chris was a huge Alabama fan dressing in his Alabama football uniform with plastic helmet and shoulder pads in his backyard. Still got beat in backyard football by Quack.



              "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
              Nick Saban 9/10/2016

              “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
              Nick Saban 05/29/2018

              “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
              Nick Saban 06/13/2018

              Comment


              • Barry Krauss




                Richard Barry Krauss (born March 17, 1957) is a former professional American football player who played linebacker for twelve seasons in the National Football League.

                born and reared in Pompano Beach, Florida; he was a star football player at Pompano Beach High School from 1972–1975.Voted as Sun Sentinel's "All-Time Broward County Linebacker", Voted to the State of Florida's "Top 100 Football All-Star Team", Most Valuable Player of the MENAC Bowl: 1975. Voted as Sun Sentinel's Player of the Year: 1975.

                Highly recruited out of high school, he played college football at the University of Alabama for the legendary coach Paul "Bear" Bryant, and was a key member of Alabama's 1978 National Championship football team. At the 1979 Sugar Bowl in one of the most famous plays in college football history, Krauss stopped Penn State running back Mike Guman short of the goal line late in the 4th quarter to help the Crimson Tide to the National Championship. Krauss was selected MVP of the game for his efforts

                Alabama's All-Century Team: 1970's, Atlanta Touchdown Club's Southeastern Conference Lineman of the Year: 1976, All-American 1977–78, All-SEC 1977–78, Liberty Bowl Most Valuable Player and Defensive Player: 1976, Sugar Bowl Most Valuable Player: 1979 (only defensive player to win MVP in first 75 years of Sugar Bowl History), Defensive Player of the Week Honor: CBS Broadcast of NCAA/Chevrolet Scholarship Program – LSU vs Alabama: 1978, Birmingham Monday Morning QB Club's Defensive Player of the Year: 1978, Inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame: 2007.

                Krauss was the first round draft choice (6th overall pick) in 1979 for the Baltimore Colts.He played ten years in the NFL with the Colts, and played his final two seasons with the Miami Dolphins. In 12 seasons, he played in 152 games, amassed over 1,000 tackles and had 8 sacks and 6 interceptions.

                today he is a professional broadcaster and motivational speaker based in Carmel, Indiana In 2007, he was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame

                He will do Indianapolis Colts preseason games alongside veteran Hoosiers broadcaster, Don Fischer, starting in 2013.
                "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                Comment


                • Phil Savage



                  Phillip Savage Jr. (born April 7, 1965) is a former American football executive. In 2019 he was the general manager for the Arizona Hotshots of the Alliance of American Football. He was the senior vice president and general manager of the Browns from 2005 to 2008. He served as Director of Player Personnel for the Baltimore Ravens under General Manager Ozzie Newsome, a former Browns' player and member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, from 2003 to 2004. He was a scout for the Browns from 1993 to 1995. He was also the former general manager of the Cleveland Browns and the executive director for the Senior Bowl.

                  Savage attended high school at Murphy High School in Mobile, Alabama and played football and baseball at the University of the South (Sewanee, Tennessee). He earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and was a three-time all-conference shortstop in baseball. He received a master's degree in physical education from the University of Alabama in 1989. Savage spent the first seven years of his career in the coaching ranks at Alabama, UCLA, and with the San Antonio Riders of the World League.

                  Savage began his career in the National Football League (NFL) as an intern with the Cleveland Browns in 1991. Savage was hired by the new Browns head coach Bill Belichick as a coach and made the transition to scouting and personnel in 1994. During his first stint in Cleveland, he worked with several talented young scouts and assistant coaches that Belichick had assembled, including Nick Saban, Kirk Ferentz, Pat Hill, and Jim Bates.

                  Savage worked his way up the ladder in the front office as a scout and personnel evaluator with the Browns, eventually following Cleveland's former owner Art Modell and the rest of the front office to Baltimore in 1995.

                  Savage then played an important role in the drafting of 10 Pro Bowl players: offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden, linebacker Ray Lewis, receiver Jermaine Lewis, linebacker Peter Boulware, cornerback Chris McAlister, running back Jamal Lewis, linebacker Adalius Thomas, tight end Todd Heap, safety Ed Reed and linebacker Terrell Suggs.

                  Savage was named Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Cleveland Browns on January 6, 2005. On December 30, 2005, reports surfaced that Savage was on the verge of being fired after less than one year on the job, an item that was quickly denied by Browns management. The speculation was based on a reported personality conflict between Savage and Browns team president John Collins. Four days after the organizational rift became public, it was Collins who resigned his post after losing the power struggle with Savage.

                  Savage stole the headlines in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft as the Browns drafted Wisconsin offensive tackle Joe Thomas with the third pick overall, and then acquired Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn with the 22nd pick, acquired through a trade with the Dallas Cowboys. The Browns gave up their 2007 second-round pick and 2008 first-round draft selection to Dallas for the chance to pick Quinn.

                  The Browns signed Savage to a three-year extension through 2012 on May 2, 2008. However, after a poor 2008 season and an email controversy involving a fan, Savage was fired on December 28, 2008

                  On February 4, 2010, Savage was hired by the Philadelphia Eagles as a player personnel consultant. In his role, Savage worked with general manager Howie Roseman and director of player personnel Ryan Grigson in preparation for the 2010 NFL Draft, specifically in the evaluation of draft prospects in the southeast part of the country. He was re-hired during training camp.[

                  Savage was named the executive director for the Senior Bowl in May 2012 where he served until May 2018.

                  In June 2018, Savage joined the Arizona Hotshots of the Alliance of American Football as their general manager

                  In April 2009, with Savage no longer in the NFL, he was asked to provide color commentary for the University of Alabama A-Day game along with Eli Gold. Savage voiced an interest in the open position left vacant by Ken Stabler. In June 2009, Savage was officially named part of the Crimson Tide Sports Network (CTSN).
                  "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                  Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                  “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                  Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                  “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                  Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                  Comment


                  • Tom Roberts




                    36 years he has spent in his broadcast career with the University of Alabama

                    Fayette native started working at 16 as a proofreader for a weekly newspaper, and, soon after, working on air at WWF as a disc jockey. His career with Alabama began in 1979. He worked for free, gathering other game scores and handing them to John Forney and Doug Layton for UA’s football radio broadcasts. That led to an on-air role for men’s basketball radio broadcasts. By the early 1990s, he was doing TV, radio and anything and everything else, often driving ridiculous distances instead of flying with UA’s teams because he had a great fear of flying.

                    “I’m looking forward to the next phase of my life and certainly have thoroughly enjoyed every bit of it up through now,” Roberts said.
                    His next phase will include life as a fan at pretty much every UA home event, likely with his new bride, the former Martha Cobb, by his side. She, too, grew up in Fayette where he was Fayette County High’s 1964 valedictorian and voted “Most Handsome,” and is in the Fayette County Sports Hall of Fame. He and Martha recently re-connected, she of a family that is in the movie theatre business, marrying in 2014. Both love to travel and have already booked a trip to France in April to celebrate his retirement.

                    Before email and internet use were available in the 1990s, Roberts’ job often involved things like taping a show in Tuscaloosa and driving the tape to Birmingham to edit or deliver to television stations, often late at night or in the wee hours after a football game. Teams depended upon him to produce and voiceover highlight videos. It is often Roberts conducting the interviews of athletes and coaches, his face unseen, voice unheard, but wise questions answered by the interviewees for the UA’s coaches’ shows and Tide TV This Week. His role as host of the weekly radio show “Hey, Coach” finds him the perfect moderator, as he follows each sport closely.
                    "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                    Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                    “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                    Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                    “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                    Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                    Comment


                    • Guy "Alabama Blossom" Morton




                      Vernon, Lamar County, native Guy "Alabama Blossom" Morton (1893-1934) played his entire Major League Baseball career in Cleveland from 1914-1924. In March 2001, the Indians organization named Morton one its "Top 100 Indians

                      nicknamed "Moose", was a Major League baseball pitcher for the Cleveland Indians. Morton was born in Vernon, AL.

                      His best years were from 1915 to 1919, where his ERA was below 3.00 every season, and he won 10 games four times.

                      Morton died at the age of 41 in Sheffield, AL from a heart attack,[3] and was buried in Vernon City Cemetery in Vernon, AL



                      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                      Comment


                      • Willie McCovey



                        Willie Lee McCovey (January 10, 1938 – October 31, 2018) was an American Major League Baseball first baseman. Known as "Stretch" during his playing days, and later also nicknamed "Mac" and "Willie Mac," he is best known for his long tenure as one of the sport's greatest stars with the San Francisco Giants.

                        Over a 22-year career between 1959 and 1980 he played 19 seasons with the Giants and three more for the San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics. A fearsome left-handed hitter, he was a six-time All-Star, three-time home run champion, MVP, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986 in his first year of eligibility, only the 16th man so honored.

                        McCovey was known as a dead-pull[1] line drive hitter, causing some teams to employ a shift against him.[2] Seventh on baseball's all-time home run list when he retired, McCovey was called "the scariest hitter in baseball" by pitcher Bob Gibson, seconded by similarly feared slugger Reggie Jackson.[3] McCovey lashed 521 home runs, 231 launched in Candlestick Park, the most there by any player. One on September 16, 1966, was described as the longest ever hit in that stadium.


                        Mobile native Willie McCovey (1938-2018) played five years of minor league ball before his Major League Baseball debut in 1959 with the San Francisco Giants. He earned the Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year award and went on to play 19 seasons for the Giants in a career that spanned 22 years.

                        McCovey was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986 in his first year of eligibility—making him the 16th player to so honored. He appeared on 346 of 425 ballots cast (81.4 percent).[20][23]

                        McCovey is best remembered for the ferocity of his line drive batting style. In his book Ball Four, pitcher Jim Bouton wrote about watching the slugger blast the ball in batting practice, while making "little whimpering animal sounds" in response to each of McCovey's raw power drives. Reds manager Sparky Anderson also had a healthy respect for the damage McCovey could do, saying "I walked Willie McCovey so many times, he could have walked to the moon on all those walks." McCovey's bat was so lethal in his prime he was intentionally walked an all-time record 45 times in 1969, shattering the previous record by a dozen. This remained the major league mark for 33 years until broken by fellow Giant Barry Bonds. The following year McCovey was intentionally walked 40 times. Once, speaking to the pitcher before a McCovey at-bat, Mets inimitable manager Casey Stengel joked, "Where do you want to pitch him, upper deck or lower deck?"

                        The inlet of San Francisco Bay beyond the right field fence of Oracle Park, historically known as China Basin, has been re-dubbed McCovey Cove in his honor. A statue of McCovey was erected across McCovey Cove from the park, and the land on which it stands named McCovey Point. On September 21, 1980, the Giants retired his uniform number 44, which he wore in honor of Hank Aaron, a fellow Mobile, Alabama native.[26][27]

                        McCovey's first marriage was to Karen McCovey, which produced a daughter. On August 1, 2018, he married longtime girlfriend Estela Bejar at AT&T Park.[32]

                        In 1996, McCovey and fellow baseball Hall of Famer Duke Snider pled guilty to federal tax fraud charges that they had failed to report about $10,000 in income from sports card shows and memorabilia sales from 1988 to 1990. McCovey was given two years of probation and fined $5,000.[33][34] He received a pardon from President Barack Obama on January 17, 2017.[35]

                        In his later years, McCovey dealt with several health issues, including atrial fibrillation and an infection in 2015 that nearly killed him. After his career ended he endured several knee surgeries, which left him in a wheelchair, and he was hospitalized several times.[36]

                        McCovey died at the age of 80 at Stanford University Medical Center on October 31, 2018 after battling "ongoing health issues". He had been hospitalized for an infection late the previous week.[11] His longtime friend and fellow Hall-of-Famer Joe Morgan was at his bedside.[
                        "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                        Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                        “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                        Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                        “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                        Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                        Comment


                        • James "Peanut" Davenport



                          Davenport grew up in Siluria, Alabama, the hometown of future teammate Willie Kirkland,[1] and not far from Willie Mays' hometown.[2] Growing up, Davenport had wanted to play football for the University of Alabama.[3] However, Davenport married after high school and Alabama had a policy of not recruiting married players. Instead, he earned a football scholarship to the University of Southern Mississippi (then called Mississippi Southern College), where he played quarterback and also joined the baseball team. In 1952 and 1953, he beat an Alabama football team who were quarterbacked both times by Bart Starr. In 1954, Davenport hit .439 for the Southern Miss baseball team, and signed a professional contract with the Giants after the season.[4]

                          Davenport made his major league debut with the San Francisco Giants on April 15, 1958, taking the team's first at-bat on the West Coast, striking out against Don Drysdaleof the Los Angeles Dodgers at Seals Stadium.[5] His best season was 1962, when he batted .297 with 14 home runs and 58 RBIs and made the All-Star team for the only time in his career.[6]

                          Davenport was known for his fielding, leading National League third basemen in fielding percentage each season from 1959–61 and winning a Gold Glove at third base in 1962.[7][5] Davenport played 97 consecutive errorless games at third base from July 26, 1966 to April 28, 1968, a record that stood until it was broken by John Wehner in the 1990s.[7]

                          He played one World Series in 1962, which the Giants lost to the New York Yankees. He had a career batting average of .258 with 77 home runs and 456 RBIs, with 1142 career hits in 4427 at bats. He played in 1501 games in 13 years, the fourth-most in San Francisco Giants history after Willie McCovey (2,256), Willie Mays (2,095) and Barry Bonds (1,976).[5] His 1,130 games played at third base are the most in Giants' history

                          He married his high school sweetheart, Betty, and had five children, a daughter and four sons.[7][1] His son Gary Davenport played minor league baseball in the Giants organization and has coached in the Giants' minor league system since 2004.[12] Davenport lived in San Carlos, California and worked in the Giants' front office until his death on February 18, 2016. He is buried in Skylawn Memorial Park near San Francisco.[13] The Giants wore a patch in his memory for the 2016 season, a black circle with an orange outline and his nickname "Davvy" and his number 12, to be worn on the left sleeve, below Monte Irvin's memorial patch
                          "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                          Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                          “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                          Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                          “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                          Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                          Comment


                          • Frank "Pig" House



                            Henry Franklin House (February 18, 1930 – March 13, 2005), nicknamed "Pig", was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the Detroit Tigers (1950–51, 1954–57, 1961), Kansas City Athletics (1958–59) and Cincinnati Reds (1961). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

                            In a 10-season career, House posted a .248 batting average with 47 home runs and 235 RBI in 653 games. As a catcher, in 580 games he compiled a .988 fielding percentage with 2934 putouts, 258 assists, and 34 errors in 2934 total chances.

                            A native of Bessemer, Alabama, House signed out of high school with the Tigers in 1948 for one of the biggest bonuses of the time – $75,000 and two automobiles, according to news reports. House made his debut in 1950 at 20 years of age. He earned his nickname as a baby, when his family used to say he was "big as a house" and he twisted "big" into "pig". As a player, he stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg). His mother-in-law said the nickname came about when he came in very dirty from playing outside and his mother told him "you're dirty as a little pig, Frank."

                            House was known as a solid defensive catcher with a fast release and a strong arm. He also called a good game and was great at blocking the plate. His most productive season came in 1955 when he hit .259 with 15 home runs and 53 RBI in 102 games. On April 21, 1958, House scored two runs as a pinch-hitter in an eight-run eighth inning, in a 9-4 Athletics victory over the Cleveland Indians. House's feat was only the sixth such occurrence in major league history.

                            House later served in the Alabama Legislature, where he was instrumental in the creation of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1967. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975 and was honored in 2004 when the Hall instituted the Frank "Pig" House Award to recognize contributors to state sports. A municipal golf course in his home town of Bessemer, Alabama, bears his name.

                            House died in Birmingham, Alabama, at age 75.[1] His interment was in Bessemer's Cedar Hill Cemetery.

                            "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                            Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                            “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                            Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                            “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                            Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                            Comment


                            • Henry Manush


                              Henry Emmett Manush (July 20, 1901 – May 12, 1971), nicknamed "Heinie", was an American baseball outfielder. Manush was nicknamed "Heinie" due to his German ancestry. He was one of eight children in the family, seven boys and one girl.[4] All seven boys took up baseball, five of them playing the game professionally He played professional baseball for 20 years from 1920 to 1939, including 17 years in Major League Baseball for the Detroit Tigers (1923–1927), St. Louis Browns (1928–1930), Washington Senators (1930–1935), Boston Red Sox(1936), Brooklyn Dodgers (1937–1938), and Pittsburgh Pirates (1938–1939). After retiring as a player, Manush was a minor league manager from 1940 to 1945, a scout for the Boston Braves in the late 1940s and a coach for the Senators from 1953 to 1954. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.

                              A native of Tuscumbia, Alabama, Manush was one of the best batters in baseball in the 1920s and 1930s. He compiled a .330 career batting average, won the American League batting championship in 1926 with a .378 batting average, finished one point short of a second batting championship in 1928, finished among the top four batters in the American League six times (1926, 1928–1929, and 1932–1934) and totaled more than 200 hits four times (1928–1929, 1932–1933). In 1928, he finished second in the voting for the American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) award after leading the American League with 241 hits and 47 doubles, while also hitting 20 triples and compiling 367 total bases. He also finished third in the MVP voting in 1932 and 1933 and was the leading batter on the 1933 Washington Senators team that won the American League pennant and lost the 1933 World Series to the New York Giants.

                              Manush was also a solid defensive outfielder, appearing in 2,008 major league games, 1,381 as a left fielder, 312 as a center fielder, and 153 as a right fielder. He led the American League with 356 putouts as a left fielder in 1928, a .992 fielding percentage in left field in 1928, and five double plays turned by a left fielder in 1935. His 2,855 putouts in left field ranks 21st in major league history.

                              In February 1964, Manush was elected by the Veterans Committee to the Baseball Hall of Fame.[62] On learning the news, Manush, at his home in Sarasota, Florida, told reporters, "It's quite a shock to me to be picked ... I feel wonderful ... I had no idea this would ever happen to me."[15]

                              The 1942 motion picture Obliging Young Lady opens with a comedic sequence in which Edmond O'Brien keeps repeating "Heinie Manush, Heinie Manush" in cadence with the sound of the train on which he is riding. At one point, a porter interrupts, "Who is Heinie Manush?", and O'Brien replies, "The great baseball player." In the dining car, O'Brien continues even as he orders, "Filet mignon that's for me, filet mignon that's for me, Heinie Manush, Heinie Manush, Heinie Manush, Heinie Manush, filet mignon, medium rare, Heinie Manush, Heinie Manush." The repetitive, onomatopoeic nature of the phrase fit the sound of the train so well that other riders began to pick it up, driving the conductor to distraction.

                              Manush was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1964,[65] and later posthumously into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1972

                              Manush fought an extended battle against throat cancer, was placed in a Sarasota nursing home on March 11, 1971, and died there on May 12, 1971.
                              "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                              Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                              “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                              Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                              “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                              Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                              Comment


                              • Cleon Jones




                                Cleon Joseph Jones (born August 4, 1942)[1] is an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a left fielder. Jones played most of his career for the New York Mets and in 1969 caught the final out of the "Miracle Mets" World Series Championship over the Baltimore Orioles

                                Jones played football and baseball at Mobile County Training School in Mobile, Alabama, and Alabama A&M University. With the Bulldogs, Jones scored 26 touchdowns in nine games. Jones signed with the New York Mets as an amateur free agent in 1963. After batting over .300 for both the Carolina League Raleigh Mets and New York–Penn League Auburn Mets, Jones received a September call-up to the major league club without having played double or triple

                                Jones was batting .341 with ten home runs and 56 RBIs in the first half of 1969 earning the starting left field job for the All-Star Game. He went two for four with two runs scored in the NL's 9–3 victory.[7] He hit a home run in the first game after the break,[8] and emerged as the hitting star of the surprising Mets, with a team-leading batting average of .340.[9]

                                After losing the first game of a double header with the Astros 16–3,[10] the Mets were down 7–0 in the third inning of the second game when Johnny Edwards hit a double to Jones in left field to make the score 8–0. Mets manager Gil Hodges emerged from the dugout, walked past Nolan Ryan on the mound, and walked all the way out to left field. A few minutes later, Hodges walked back to the dugout, with Jones a few paces behind him, and replaced Jones in left with Ron Swoboda.[11] Newspapers at the time said Jones suffered a leg injury and he was not in the Mets lineup for several games[12] after July 30. Later accounts say that Jones was removed for failure to hustle,[13] and Hodges decided to do so publicly to show that he would not tolerate lack of effort on his team, even from its star player.[14]

                                On August 22, 2009, following pre-game ceremonies honoring the 40th anniversary of the "Miracle Mets", Jones discussed the incident during SportsNet New York's telecast of that night's game. Jones said Hodges asked him why he did not look good going after a fly ball on the previous play. According to Jones, he pointed down to the water-filled turf. Hodges then said that something must be wrong with Jones's ankle and pulled him for that reason. Jones explained that Hodges was his favorite manager, and that he would never publicly embarrass a player. According to Jones, neither party ever revealed the contents of the conversation. Jones believes that the fear instilled in other players by the incident was the turning point in the season.

                                The Mets won 38 of their last 50 games, and finished the 1969 season with 100 wins against 62 losses, eight games over the second place Cubs. Jones ended the season with a .340 batting average, which was third in the league behind Pete Rose and Roberto Clemente, and was second on the team in home runs, RBIs and runs scored, behind Tommie Agee in all three categories.

                                Jones batted a stellar .429 in the Mets' three game sweep of the Atlanta Braves in the 1969 National League Championship Series. In game two of the series, Jones went three for five with a home run, two runs scored and three RBIs in the Mets' 11–6 victory.[16]

                                The Mets were heavy underdogs in the 1969 World Series but took a 3–1 series lead. The Orioles were ahead 3–0 in game five when Jones led off the sixth inning. Dave McNally struck Jones in the foot with a pitch, however, home plate umpire Lou DiMuro ruled that the ball missed Jones. Gil Hodges emerged from the dugout to argue, and showed DiMuro the shoe-polish smudged ball. DiMuro reversed his call, and awarded Jones first base. The following batter, Donn Clendenon, hit a two-run home run to pull the Mets within a run of Baltimore.

                                Following an Al Weis solo home run in the seventh to tie the game, Jones led off the eighth inning with a double off the wall that missed being a home run by about 2 ft (0.61 m), and scored on Ron Swoboda's double two batters later. With the Mets leading 5–3 in the ninth inning, Orioles second baseman Davey Johnson hit a 2-1 fastball which Jones caught near the warning track to win the World Series.

                                Jones suffered a knee injury, and was out on extended spring training when the 1975 season started. At 5:00 a.m. on May 4, Jones was arrested for indecent exposure in St. Petersburg, Florida. Police officers found him asleep in a van with 21-year-old Sharon Ann Sabol, who was charged with possession of marijuana. Jones said he did not know Miss Sabol, but was giving her a ride home in a friend's borrowed van, which ran out of gas, and that he had fallen asleep fully clothed, except for his shoes, waiting for help.[23][24] The charges were later dropped, but chairman of the New York Mets M. Donald Grant fined Jones $2,000, four times as much as a Met had ever been assessed before, and forced him to publicly apologize during a press conference held in New York. Jones apologized with his wife Angela, his high school sweetheart, by his side.[25] He and Angela have been married for more than 50 years.

                                Jones was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1991. His .340 average in 1969 remained a team record until John Olerud batted .354 in 1998. Jones remains among the team's all-time leaders in games played, at bats, and hits.

                                Jones is a member of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame,[26] and a member of the Mobile Sports Hall of Fame.

                                In June 2012, Jones was selected as the Mets' "All-Time Leftfielder" by a panel of sports writers and broadcasters, an honor which he said "means a lot to me."



                                "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                                Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                                “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                                Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                                “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                                Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                                Comment

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