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Do You Really Know Alabama?

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  • Originally posted by quack quack bang View Post
    I bet that was exciting to watch. How did it make you feel?
    Mockery. That's what I get in return when I try to educate you shitkickers.

    Comment


    • Birds of Alabama



      Few states can match Alabama's rich diversity of birds. Their songs, colors and habits enrich our lives like no other animal group, and they offer tremendous recreational, economic, psychological, and scientific benefit. Alabama's relatively mild winters and great variety of habitats attract and support winter visitors and summer-breeding birds alike. In addition, Alabama lies along the migration routes of many species that find it an attractive place to rest and refuel as they make their long journeys between their wintering grounds and their nesting areas in North America. Currently, the Alabama Ornithological Society recognizes 433 species that have been seen in the state. From this list, about 158 are considered regular breeders within Alabama's borders, around 80 species are migrants, and another 175 or so are classified as winter residents. Within these groups, a significant diversity of forms and habits can be found.

      Waterfowl

      These web-footed birds include the ducks, geese, and swans (Order Anseriformes) The 20 or so species that regularly inhabit Alabama's many ponds, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters are excellent swimmers. Many species, including the lesser scaup, hooded merganser, ruddy duck, and bufflehead, are superb divers and feed on fish and aquatic invertebrates such as snails and mussels. Others, like the Canada goose, mallard, gadwall, American wigeon, and blue-winged teal, are dabblers who feed on vegetation and animal life near the surface or by grazing. Almost all of the waterfowl that come to Alabama are winter visitors escaping the cold, snow, and ice at higher latitudes that make finding food difficult during the winter months. These migrants typically start arriving in the state in late September and October and set out for their more northern breeding grounds in March and April. Only the wood duck is a common year-round resident, although domestic Canada geese and mallards have been introduced and have become pests in many areas, especially at golf courses and parks. Domestic waterfowl introduced into the wild pose problems because they compete with native species, alter habitats, and spread disease. Many of the waterfowl, as well as the wild turkey, northern bobwhite (Order Galliformes), American woodcock, Wilson's snipe (Order Charadriiformes), and mourning dove (Order Columbiformes), are also considered gamebirds and are regularly hunted during the appropriate season

      Waders

      The waders include the herons, bitterns, egrets, ibises, rails, and the wood stork(Order Ciconiiformes). These birds tend to be tall and typically have long necks, long skinny legs, and toes that allow them to move efficiently through shallow, mucky waters in search of fish, frogs, snakes, and other aquatic life. Some, like the herons, egrets, and bitterns, jab their prey with their dagger-like beaks, while others, like ibises and storks, move their sensitive bills constantly through the water and quickly grab anything that feels like food. Approximately 15 different species of waders are found in the state. The great blue heron and the white great egret are two of the largest and most commonly occurring species.

      Birds of Prey

      Birds of prey include the osprey, kites, eagles, hawks, and owls. Although owls (Order Strigiformes) are not closely related to the other birds of prey (Order Falconiformes), both groups have toes with sharp talons (claws) on their feet, which are used to capture their prey, and hooked beaks for tearing flesh. Hawks that regularly occur in Alabama vary in size and shape, but they can be divided into three subgroups: the relatively large, broad-winged, soaring buteos such as the red-tailed hawk, red-shouldered hawk, and broad-winged hawk; the smaller, sleeker, and faster accipiters, such as the sharp-shinned hawk and Cooper's hawk; and the fast, tapered-winged falcons, such as the American kestrel. The red-tailed hawk, Alabama's most common hawk, is a year-round resident

      Most birds of prey are active during the day, but owls hunt primarily at night.
      In Alabama, there is only one regularly occurring eagle, the bald eagle. [what does this say about a certain mascot in west Georgia????] Alabama has four owl species that regularly occur throughout the state. The most frequently heard is the barred owl

      Shorebirds and Gulls

      The shorebirds (Order Charadriiformes) include plovers, oystercatchers, sandpipers, gulls, and terns. Of the 35 species of plovers and sandpipers that are regularly found in the state, only about seven species actually breed within its borders, and only one, the killdeer, commonly nests throughout the state. the greatest abundance and diversity of gulls in Alabama occurs during the winter months; only the laughing gull is a year-round resident. The laughing gull is a common site along Alabama's beaches and is easily identified in summer by its black head and laughing call. The other three commonly occurring species (the herring gull, ring-billed gull, and Bonaparte's gull) arrive primarily in October and November when temperatures drop further to the north.

      Woodpeckers

      Alabama is home to eight species, and all but the yellow-bellied sapsucker, a winter visitor, are year-round residents. The northern flicker, also known as the yellowhammer, is the state bird

      Perching Birds

      The most diverse group of birds in the world and in the state is the perching birds, or passerines (Order Passeriformes). In Alabama, around 140 regularly occur. Within this group are many year-round residents that inhabit yards and farms and visit feeders, including species such as the blue jay, tufted titmouse, Carolina chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, Carolina wren, northern mockingbird, eastern towhee, northern cardinal, eastern meadowlark, red-winged blackbird, and house finch. Others are transients, and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats of Alabama provide critical food and resting areas as these species make their long, energy-intensive, and dangerous migrations between their wintering and breeding grounds. Such species include the rose-breasted grosbeak, Swainson's thrush, gray-cheeked thrush, bank swallow, magnolia warbler, Cape May warbler, Blackburnian warbler, and bobolink. Many passerines end their journey in Alabama and are recognized as either summer or winter residents. Summer residents spend their winter months in places such as the West Indies, Mexico, and Central and South America and include the indigo bunting, orchard oriole, blue grosbeak, summer tanager, scarlet tanager, purple martin, cliff swallow, barn swallow, and red-eyed vireo. Many of these migrants fly over the Gulf of Mexico and take off and land from the very important natural coastal habitats of Alabama. The peak periods for most species that migrate through Alabama are late March through late May in the spring and early September through early November in the autumn. Summer residents leave the state for the winter because their food becomes more difficult to find during the colder months of the year.


      Birdwatching Areas and Conservation

      There are many excellent areas for viewing and studying birds scattered throughout the state. For example, on the Gulf Coast, Dauphin Island, Fort Morgan and other coastal areas are favorite locations for birds and birders alike. These areas offer birders the greatest variety of species, but because of rapid development, they also have some of the most threatened habitats and birds in the state. Federal lands, such as Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in the Tennessee Valley and Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge along the border with Georgia on the Coastal Plain, provide important sanctuaries for wintering waterfowl, summer and winter residents, and transients. National forests, including Bankhead and Talladega, as well as state parks such as Monte Sano, Cheaha, Oak Mountain, and Buck's Pocket offer much-needed natural habitat for birds and other animals and can offer exceptional areas to watch and study birds. The state has established a number of birding trails, such as the Alabama Coastal Birding Trail and the North Alabama Birding Trail, that offer interested people excellent places to observe and enjoy birds.
      "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
      Nick Saban 9/10/2016

      “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
      Nick Saban 05/29/2018

      “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
      Nick Saban 06/13/2018

      Comment





      • can we find mountain lions in Alabama? Commonly found in western parts of the United States, scientists say their range is expanding. The most recent confirmed sighting nearest to Alabama happened September 2016 in Wayne County Tennessee. This county borders the north-western part of Alabama. Does this mean there could be mountain lions in Alabama? Some seem to think so; others are skeptical.

        Today mountain lions are prospering in the western U.S., especially in California and Arizona. But the species has made its way back into states where they were previously extinct, the closest being Missouri, Tennessee and Florida.

        “That increases the chances of them returning to the state. So, the possibility is there, but as of right now we don’t have any hard evidence that it is reoccurring.”

        The endangered Florida panther, a subspecies of the western mountain lion, resides in forests and swamps of southern Florida. According to Armstrong, it is highly unlikely that species would migrate up to Alabama without anyone seeing it on its way. “It’d be more likely we’d have animals coming down into the state from the West.”

        According to Armstrong, ironically the Eastern cougar has just been declared extinct by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is ironic in that many researchers believe that subspecies has been extinct since the early 1970s.
        Can we find mountain lions in Alabama? The most recent confirmed sighting nearest to Alabama happened September 2016 in Wayne County Tennessee. This county borders the north-western part of Alabama. Does this mean there could be mountain lions in Alabama? Some seem to think so; others are skeptical.
        "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
        Nick Saban 9/10/2016

        “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
        Nick Saban 05/29/2018

        “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
        Nick Saban 06/13/2018

        Comment


        • Black Bears in Alabama



          Historically, Alabama’s black bear population only occurred in the southwest portion of the state, primarily in Mobile, Washington and Clarke counties. The bears of this region of the state are of the Florida subspecies, Ursus americanus floridanus, and while in low numbers here, are quite abundant throughout many areas of Florida.

          In recent years, black bears have steadily immigrated into northeast Alabama from northwest Georgia, primarily to DeKalb, Cherokee and Etowah counties, and have established a small, but viable population in that region of the state. While these bears look very similar to the Florida bear, they are classified as a different subspecies, the American Black Bear, Ursus americanus americanus. In addition to these core areas, sporadic bear sightings have been documented in other areas throughout the state, which may indicate that Alabama’s black bear populations are slowly increasing.
          https://www.outdooralabama.com/black...ma-black-bears


          BIRMINGHAM, AL - Add Jackson, Limestone, Marshall, Morgan and St. Clair counties to the growing list of black bear sightings in Alabama in 2018. Recently, bear sightings have also been recorded in Chambers, Elmore, Jefferson, Lee, Macon and Tallapoosa counties. These recent sightings are more evidence of the state's expanding black bear population, according to the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
          A video of a black bear in the parking lot of a Leeds Waffle House made its way through social media last month, and another sighting of a black bear was recorded earlier this month in Irondale near Grants Mill.
          https://patch.com/alabama/birmingham...s-rise-alabama


          HOOVER, AL (WBRC) - Saturday morning was anything but typical for Jamie Riddle and his wife.
          A black bear was just feet away from them. It was spotted in the back yard of their Greystone Highlands Circle home.
          https://www.wbrc.com/story/38441378/...r-in-backyard/



          CENTER POINT, Ala. — Jefferson County deputies responded to reports of a loose bear in the 100 block of Hillview Lane in Center Point on Thursday.
          One woman got the surprise of a lifetime when a bear popped up in her backyard. ABC 33/40 NEWS obtained surveillance from the home of Robin Jones who captured the moment it faced off with her dog.
          https://abc3340.com/news/local/black...earch-underway



          A black bear is now at the Birmingham Zoo after it was found roaming the streets of Ensley late Monday night.
          https://abc3340.com/archive/bpd-cont...-get-it-to-zoo
          Another bear sighting in Birmingham

          Birmingham police and Birmingham Zoo officials are in the 9000 block of Roebuck Blvd trying to locate a 200lb bear. Officials from the Alabama Department of Conservation are also on the scene.

          BPD K-9 units have arrived on the scene to help locate the bear.

          https://www.wbrc.com/story/14974134/...ng-in-roebuck/



          https://www.wvtm13.com/article/resid...orhood/3431416


          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5q1qBXMlbtQ



          "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
          Nick Saban 9/10/2016

          “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
          Nick Saban 05/29/2018

          “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
          Nick Saban 06/13/2018

          Comment


          • "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire ..."

            https://www.acf.org/wp-content/uploa...adega_tree.pdf


            Also, there's this from AL.com 2 yrs ago.....

            Most of us know this opening line of a classic Christmas carol, but it was more than a bygone image for most of American history. American chestnut trees, 4 billion strong, dominated the forests from Alabama to Maine from colonial times to the early 1900s. Their wood built American homes, and their nuts were so popular that, well, people wrote songs about them.

            That was all before a fungus wiped out most of America's chestnuts starting in the 1880s. Billions of trees died, and it was more than loss of a holiday snack. The chestnut was a serious food source for animals and humans. Chestnut flour was an ingredient in Southern recipes for decades.

            Some American chestnuts survive in Alabama and elsewhere in the East, and passionate people have been trying to bring the tree back through specialized breeding programs. Now, Huntsville's HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology is joining the fight. Institute researchers will sequence the DNA of American chestnuts that survived to establish a scientific profile.

            "If we can develop tools to do this with chestnuts, we can do this with almost any forest tree species," said Jeremy Schmutz, co-director of the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center. "This is a major issue now. You probably know about things like ash bore killing off all the ash trees, about the sudden oak death in California, which is being brought on in part by the drought. What we're seeing is many new pathogens ... entering our American ecosystem and causing major issues in the forests."

            Where do these pathogens come from? Likely sources include Asian nursery stock and trade with Asia, Schmutz said, adding, "Globalization has pluses and minuses." Trade makes American agricultural products valuable in other countries, and it brings pathogens and insects from those countries to America.


            Funding for the DNA analysis came from a grant by the Colcom Foundation to the American Chestnut Foundation.

            The goal is to finish the genetic profile in a year to 18 months. And when that profile is complete, researchers will study the diversity of the chestnut trees that remain, study the fungus in detail, and develop a screening test to tell what trees are truly resistant.

            "From the chestnut foundation perspective, the goal is how do we move forward with an intelligent plan for reintroducing these resistant trees," Schmutz said.

            Even those trees face other challenges including a root fungus. "It's not that easy," he said. "None of these situations where you're talking about trying to reformulate the natural ecosystem is easy....It's an ambitious project trying to restore the American chestnut. It's a major undertaking."

            https://www.al.com/news/huntsville/2...ht_to_bri.html



            "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
            Nick Saban 9/10/2016

            “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
            Nick Saban 05/29/2018

            “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
            Nick Saban 06/13/2018

            Comment


            • "If we can develop tools to do this with chestnuts, we can do this with almost any forest tree species," said Jeremy Schmutz, co-director of the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center.

              I might note that Schmutz means shit in German. It's refreshing to see a legitimate reason for immigration.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Sid Youngleman
                "If we can develop tools to do this with chestnuts, we can do this with almost any forest tree species," said Jeremy Schmutz, co-director of the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center.

                I might note that Schmutz means shit in German. It's refreshing to see a legitimate reason for immigration.
                Well, Levi’s found a cure for Chet’s hot rivet syndrome, so anything’s possible.


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                Comment







                • Featured in the story


                  TIM HONTZAS
                  JOHNNY’S


                  TASOS & BEBA TOUPLOUPIS
                  TED’S


                  DEMETRI NAKOS
                  Demetri’s




                  From souvlaki to hot dogs, baklava to snapper throats, and barbecue to meat-and-threes, the South and Greece intertwine in Alabama.
                  "There were no arguments, those were ass chewings....."
                  Nick Saban 9/10/2016

                  “I don’t know who is driving all this stuff, but to me it’s kind of like mouse manure when you’re up to your ears in elephant doo-doo,"
                  Nick Saban 05/29/2018

                  “You’re ruining the game with RPOs and illegal guys downfield. And you think it should be legal. You think it’s normal. Kiss my ass.”
                  Nick Saban 06/13/2018

                  Comment

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